Campus Conversations

Campus Conversations are a series of panel discussions which bring together college students and experts to discuss various issues that affect young people. The interactive sessions are meant to engage students and foster a culture of healthy sexual behaviour and attitudes. Campus Conversations are an initiative of Campus Moments Magazine in partnership with Sexual Rights Center Bulawayo.

Save the dates

  1. 14 July 2017 – Tackling the Condom Shame 

Concept Note:

Development Objective(s):

  • To promote a culture of healthy sexual behaviour.
  • To increase awareness of Reproductive Health and Rights.

Program Details and Rationale:

Tackling the condom shame is a panel discussion which brings together students and Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights experts to deliberate young people’s attitudes to the condom as a means of safe sex and contraception.

It turns out that whilst most sexually active young people are not ashamed to admit that they are having sex, they are embarrassed to buy condoms and other forms of contraception.

 This ‘shame’ leads to risky behaviours such as indulging in unprotected sex. Statistics show that the bulk of new infections are occurring among college –age young women(National Aids Council 2016).

Expected Outputs/Results:

To re-frame the act of buying contraceptive so it’s not a declaration of having uncommitted sex, but a smart choice to protect oneself against STI’s and unwanted pregnancies.

Contribution to the sustainable development agenda:

The panel discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG number 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for Zimbabwe’s youth.

Gender Strategy:

 This program has no explicit gender focus, young men and women are expected to benefit equally from the program.

#condomShame

25 August 2017 – Diversity on Campus. 

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Aims:

  1. To understand what diversity in higher education means
  2. To share experiences of diverse groups in tertiary institutions
  3. To facilitate a process of learning to encourage acceptance and acknowledgement of differences as part of fair and equal treatment of students

What is diversity?

Diversity can be defined as the sum of the ways that people are both alike and different. Diversity in education represents a broad range of ideas and initiatives to create learning environments that are safe, inclusive and equitable for as many identities as possible. Recognizing, fostering and developing sensitivity to the needs of people in various identity categories are primary aims of educational diversity.

Types of diversity:

  • Gender
  • Racial
  • Ethnic
  • Socio-economic
  • Physical Ability
  • Sexual Orientation

Experiences of diverse populations:

  • Campus Environment:  Feelings of safety?
  • (social experiences)        Feelings of belonging?
    • Feelings of inclusion?
    • Harassment?
    • Discrimination?
    • Cyber Bullying?

Classroom Environment: Feelings of inclusion?

  • Discrimination?
  • Bullying?
  • Free access to classes or activities?

8 September 2017Sex, alcohol and drug abuse on campus. 

Development Objectives

  • To raise awareness on dangers associated with drug and substance abuse.
  • To reduce alcohol and drug related problems on campuses.

Program details and rationale

Partying, drinking and using drugs are common experiences on college campuses in Zimbabwe. For most young people, tertiary education also brings a newfound sense of freedom as they are solely responsible for decisions that affect their day to day life. This freedom culminates in a greater risk of students developing abusive habits during their college years.

The panel discussion is intended to educate young adults on the specific risks of activities and environments involving drugs and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, the meeting is expected to ensure safety students and their fellows.

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Expected outputs and results.

  • To make students more responsible when using drugs and alcohol.
  • To increase their awareness of specific risks of abusing drugs and alcohol.

Contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals.

The panel discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG number 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for Zimbabwe’s youth. Also, the discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG 4 of ensuring in promoting quality education and lifelong learning.

Gender Strategy:

This program has no explicit gender focus, young men and women are expected to benefit equally from the program.

Hashtags

#CampusConversations

#AboveTheInfluence

#SucceedSober

Talking Points:

  • What have been the trends of alcohol and drug abuse in Zimbabwe campuses over the past 5 years?
  • What are the common substances found on campuses?
  • What are the risks associated with these common substances? / how can they affect one’s college life?
  • How are STI’s, suicides, dropouts and crime associated with alcohol and drug abuse
  • Where do students access drugs and alcohol?
  • How do we recognise a substance addiction?
  • Where can students with alcohol and drug addiction get help?
  • Is it really possible to enjoy college and actually succeed sober?

22 September 2017 – Transactional sex and relationships on campus. 

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Development Objectives

  • To create understanding of what transactional relationships are.
  • To raise awareness on dangers associated with transactional relationships and sex on campus.
  • To reduce problems related to transactional sex & relationships campuses such as sexual harassment, HIV/ STI’s and unwanted pregnancies.

Program details and rationale

“Thigh for a mark,” “blesser,” “fuck boy,” “trophy partner,” and  “bae allowance” are popular phrases that point to transactional relationships on campus. Transactional relationships and sex are a common practice in Zimbabwe’s tertiary institutions. These kinds of relationships are believed to be contributing to unsafe and inequitable sexual practices by researchers. Many of these relationships are inscribed across differences of wealth, age and status that intersect with gender in multiple, complex ways, it is argued that these may be exacerbating unsafe and coercive sexual practices among this group of young people (Tersha, Clowes and Vergani: 2012). Some have linked transactional sex practices with disproportionately high rates of HIV among young women (15-24) in sub-Saharan Africa. Young women have HIV rates 2x that of young men.

The panel discussion is intended to educate young adults, male and female, on the specific risks of engaging in transactional relationships

Expected outputs and results.

  • To help students make smart relationship choices
  • To increase their awareness of specific risks of engaging in transactional sex.

Contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals.

The panel discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG number 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for Zimbabwe’s youth. Also, the discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG 4 of ensuring in promoting quality education and lifelong learning.

Gender Strategy:

This program has no explicit gender focus, young men and women are expected to benefit equally from the program.

Talking Points:

  • Defining transactional relationships and sex?
  • What are the determinants of transactional relationships?
  • Conceptualizing transactional sex.
  • What are the risks associated with transactional sex?
  • What can young women and men in colleges do to protect themselves if: They are victims of such a relationship; They are agents of such a relationship. 
  • What can we do about transactional sex and relationships?

6 October 2017 – Compulsive sexual behaviour on campus 

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Development Objectives

  • To raise awareness on dangers associated with compulsive sexual behaviour.
  • To reduce problems associated with compulsive sexual behaviour on campuses.

Program details and rationale

Compulsive sexual behaviour (CSB) is a term that characterizes repetitive and intense preoccupations with sexual fantasies, urges, and behaviours that are distressing to the individual and/or result in psychosocial impairment.

CSB is characterized by sexual desires, which include compulsive sexual acts with multiple partners, constant fixation on a partner who may be considered unobtainable, compulsive masturbation, compulsive use of pornography, and compulsive sex and sexual acts within a consensual relationship.

CSB is thought to be associated with sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection, unintended pregnancies, viewing of pornography on campus, at home and extensive cybersex users who use the Internet to seek partners. Thus, the WHO believes that it is clinically useful to view CSB as being related to other disorders that are also characterized by repeated failures to resist impulses, drives, or urges despite long-term harm. In 2014, a Cambridge University study found that pornography triggers brain activity in sex addicts in the same way drugs trigger drug addicts.

The panel discussion is intended to raise students’ awareness on CSB. The World Health Organisation believes that diagnoses, such as CSB, that affect public health should be recognized. Furthermore, the meeting is expected to discourage repetitive sexual disorders.

Expected outputs and results.

  • To make students aware of CSB and its related disorders.
  • To lower physical and mental health problems related to CSB on Campus.

Contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals.

The panel discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG number 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for Zimbabwe’s youth. Also, the discussion will contribute to the achievement of SDG 4 of ensuring in promoting quality education and lifelong learning.

Gender Strategy:

This program has no explicit gender focus, young men and women are expected to benefit equally from the program.

Hashtags

#CampusConversations

#AboveTheInfluence

#CSB

Talking Points:

  • What is CSB?
  • What are the symptoms of CSB?
  • How much sex is too much sex?
  • How is it related to other addictions?
  • How is CSB linked to other medical complications and social problems such as STIs, depression, anxiety, sexual harassment and poor performance at school?
  • How can students suffering from CSB reclaim their lives?
  • How can CSB’s affect around you?
  • Where can students get help if they or a friend is exhibiting symptoms of CSB?
  • What kind of diagnosis and treatment is available for those with CSB to reclaim their lives?

20 October 2017

3 November 2017

17 November 2017

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