Tag Archives: USA

Binga-born student makes shortlist for prestigious 2019 Rhodes Scholarship programme

St Kate News
2 minute read

THE Selection Committee for the Zimbabwe Rhodes Scholarship programme has announced that a St. Catherine University student is a finalist for the 2019 programme.

Maakwe Cumanzala is an international student at the Minnesota Catholic liberal arts university in with a double major in economics and mathematics.

“This is an extremely competitive award, so being named a finalist is a remarkable achievement” said Lynda Szymanski, Interim Provost and Professor of Psychology at St. Catherine University.

“Maakwe is an extraordinary student and campus leader. Faculty, staff, and alumnae recognized her potential and encouraged her to apply for the Rhodes Scholarship; it is a fabulous example of how we live our mission to educate women to lead and influence.

“Maakwe is an extraordinary student and campus leader. Faculty, staff, and alumnae recognized her potential and encouraged her to apply for the Rhodes Scholarship

“We are proud of Maakwe, and we are thankful for all members of our community who have helped prepare her to be a competitive applicant.”

The Rhodes Scholarships are the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship awards in the world.

Administered by the Rhodes Trust in Oxford, the programme offers fully-funded Scholarships each year for post-graduate study at the University of Oxford – one of the world’s leading universities.

Selection Committees for the Scholarships look for young leaders of outstanding intellect and character who are motivated to engage with global challenges, committed to the service of others and show promise of becoming value-driven, principled leaders for the world’s future.

Cumanzala has embraced several leadership opportunities while a student at St. Catherine University, including President of the International Students Organization, Peer Mentor with the Multicultural and International Programs and Services, co-President of the Economics Club, and a Transfer Orientation Coordinator.

In her current role as the Student Senate President at St. Kate’s, Cumanzala is working with other student leaders to effectively advocate for inclusive change and empowerment of students on campus through student initiatives.

Cumanzala’s college career reflects her greater life goals.

“I come from a small town – Binga, Zimbabwe,” she explained.

“Growing up, I was exposed to the disparities that the Tonga people face – especially the women and young girls so I decided at a very young age that I wanted to bring about the economic empowerment of my tribe and all other minority people in the world.

“The first step is for me to receive a sound education.”

Each finalist participates in an interview, to be held in Harare, Zimbabwe. If she is chosen to move forward as a Rhodes Scholar, Cumanzala intends to pursue an MPhil in Economics at the University of Oxford.

She also hopes to collaborate and receive mentorship from the renowned professors in the Centre for the Study of African Economies

Following her Oxford studies, Cumanzala plans to pursue a Ph.D. in Development Economics, and establish an independent economics research lab in Zimbabwe to use data-driven evidence to inform policy.

“The Rhodes scholarship would offer me a unique opportunity to gain knowledge and skills to create theories that will be influential in setting domestic and international policies that bring about equality in the world,” said Cumanzala.

“As a Rhodes Scholar, I would continue being an exemplary academic and leader to inspire minority girls to engage in higher education and claim their seat at the table.”

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Diary of a Zimbo Studying Abroad: Check In – Summer 2018

5 minute read

I auditioned for an accapella group on campus last week (I know, you can gasp out loud). If you’ve lived with me for an extended period of time, you might know that I like to sing, but I would have never dreamt of doing it in front of a group of amazing people sitting behind desks while noting everything I did in their notebooks.

Sadly, I did not perform as well as I had expected to. I find this funny because I thought accapella groups hardly reject people. The other thing is that the only accapella group I auditioned for is one of the best on campus so maybe I was way over my head.

During the audition, I knew that I had not done as well as I had been expecting and I remember feeling dejected for a couple of hours after the audition. I think I was daunted by the fact that the person who auditioned right before me had been so good and sang Stone Cold by Demi Lovato.

Now, I have huge respect for anyone who sings any Demi Lovato song and still sounds good, but that also intimidated me. The other thing might be that I am a decent singer but I am not amazing.

I know that and I have made peace with it. But, the experience revealed to me a few things I had neglected to take note of over the summer/winter break. Here they are, in no particular order.

Take it as it comes
I am one year closer to twenty-one this year, which makes me happy. What makes me happier, however, is the growth I’ve seen in the way I handle disappointment. I am able to be kind to myself and to forgive myself for what I deem to be my failures.

Being able to objectively figure out causes and effects without getting too emotional over them has been another area of growth for me. Understanding that the effort I put in is as important as the outcome has opened up my mind to the possibility of enjoying the ride while I work towards the end goal. The goal was to get into the accapella group.

I spent a lot of time practicing and I enjoyed every moment of going over which song to sing with my friends. I might not have made it into the group, but the process of getting ready for the auditions made me challenge myself and fall back on a support system I had not taken the time to acknowledge last year.

“But if you never try, you’ll never know.”
I love this T-shirt I got two years ago which has a motto on it which I have come to live by without realizing it. I’ve realized that I would rather try, despite going against my defaults, than have questions beginning with the words “What if?” weighing me down. I’ll be honest, I almost did not audition. Just like I almost did not go for the first day of my internship with Women’s Coalition of Zimbabwe (WCoZ) through the Zimbabwe Career Connect (ZCC) back in June. I have a very deep-seated fear of the unknown.

I lie planning for the future, but when the future becomes reality and I have to get down to doing what it is I set out to do in the first place, I suddenly have trouble breathing or thinking straight.

In both instances, I had to put one foot of the other and keep walking to the place I wanted to go to. Last week while I sat outside listening to the amazing person who sang before me, I almost stood up and left.

In June, during our initial meeting at Education Matters, I sat in a circle with people I did not know and wondered why I would want to be taking a four-hour commute, including time spent in traffic, to and from the WCoZ offices during the Zimbabwean winter. In both cases, I realized that the regret of not knowing what might have been would weigh me down for the longest time.

Book of Gratitude
I began keeping a book of gratitude over my break as an effort to find the little things I enjoyed about my time back at home instead of concentrating on all the negatives that were pervasive to my experience. Writing the three things I was grateful for at the end of each day became my favorite daily ritual and I have promised myself to continue doing it at Wellesley.

My book of gratitude helps me to slow down and appreciate a little bit of the abundant good in my life every day. Without that book of gratitude, I know I would have focused more on the cold weather and my long commute.

Instead, I was grateful for my supervisor’s guidance at WCoZ and the conversations I had with strangers in the combis. Last week, after I got rejected, I know I would have focused more on how I failed to impress and how it made me feel inadequate.

Instead, I was grateful for the support I received and the realization that while the goal matters, the experience is important too. Outside of these two events, I am filled with gratitude for the chance to experience a liberal arts education, the support my family gives me, the people I am coming into contact with and the connections I am making on a daily basis.

Not that I did not appreciate all of this before, but having ten minutes of the day where all I am concentrating on is gratitude has helped me to see this clearly.

Which is to say that..
My summer/winter break was not the best out there; In fact, it was filled with disappointment. My first week of classes has been a whirlwind of excitement, anger, confusion and laughter.

I, however, refuse to police the happiness derived from the experiences which come with seeing one’s family after a while and seeing one’s friends after three months and from simply being home. I have resolved to enjoy the experiences that come my way, walking undaunted and pursuing my goals fearlessly while nurturing the values I cultivate along the journey.

Curated from USAP Perspectives: http://www.edmattersafrica.org

Diary of a Zimbo Studying Abroad: Finding the Good

4 minute read

It seems like I have been here in North Carolina for only a few days but apparently two months have passed since I left home in Zimbabwe.

People ask me how my first entrance into the USA was and I always burst into laughter first before I tell them the ordeal –  that my flight got cancelled after waiting for it for 6 hours, that I could not contact anyone because my sister accidentally locked me out of my WhatsApp account as soon as I left home, how I almost spent the night on the floor of the Newark airport, eyes red from crying.

It has been a hard transition right from the starting point, but as you will notice, I have learned to laugh it out, and then to go on. 

I would be lying if I said I haven’t reached a moment when I felt I couldn’t go on. There have been times when I felt like going crazy because people couldn’t decipher my Zimbabwean accent and kept on telling me to repeat my words more than twice.

I got to the point where I decided not to say anything unless asked.  Then one day in the biology laboratory, an American girl walked up to me and said, “Are you French?  You have a cute French accent.” I laughed so hard before telling her that I was Zimbabwean.

She is the first real friend I made, one who became so eager to learn about Zimbabwe and about me as a person. I never thought I was going to make friends, but I finally found my kind of people, right in the almost all-white crowds of students.  It feels so better to have just a few people really eager to get to know me than to have crowds pretending to like me.   

On the tenth of October, I met Carlos Alvarez and his family, a multimillionaire businessman, originally from Mexico; I learned that it is he who pays my and my big USAP sister Kim Bako’s tuition and fees. His daughter is a Davidson alumni, Class of 2002 and his vision, inspired by the solid education she received from Davidson, has always been to improve the diversity at Davidson by bringing in high-achieving, low-income international students like myself from all over the world. Mr. Alvarez and his family are not only generous, but also very kind. He also grew up in a family that was struggling to survive on a small business and in our conversation, he constantly he reminded me of how special I was and how I motivated him.

As he introduced me as the most recent Alvarez scholar, I found myself thinking that it does not matter how many people do not understand me because I am African, or how my job in the dining services can be so tiring or the drop in grades that welcomed me to college as I try to learn the differences in the U.S. academic system.

What matters is that there is a lot of good in the world if people can still show this much love to someone they do not even know, someone who will not necessarily bring any benefit to them. There is so much good in me too, and I can make a difference in the world. 

I have fallen in love with Davidson College. After these two short months in North Carolina, I cannot imagine myself anywhere else. I love the small town of Davidson too, the soft music I hear in the shop nearby when I take a walk in the evening, the old African-American couple from a local church who said they wished they could adopt me, and my host family who always find time in their busy schedules to make my transition to Davidson smoother. I will forever be grateful to USAP and Education Matters, to Davidson and the Alvarez family, for the incredible gift to see life from this perspective.  

Curated from USAP Perspective:http://www.edmattersafrica.org

Dear Part 2’s and 3’s | URGENT ATTENTION:2017 GLOBAL UGRAD PROGRAM

You are all invited to Apply for a semester long study abroad scholarship, the 2017 Global UGRAD Program in the United States of America. Students from ALL faculties are eligible. Try Your Luck Click the link below to apply. If u need help email help@campusmoments.org | whatsapp +1.402.304.6540

http://exchangeprograms.worldlearning.org/index.cfm?FuseAction=PublicDocuments.View&File_ID=060075757B773F7A7203047C0774751C0D09030F1A7B7077051C070475727C0705057376747571010D0D

2017 Global UGRAD Program

tDear Part 2’s and 3’s | URGENT ATTENTION:

You are all invited to Apply for a semester long study abroad scholarship, the 2017 Global UGRAD Program in the United States of America. Students from ALL faculties are eligible. Once accepted you will be enrolled in undergraduate course work at a host institution to allow ample opportunity for substantive interaction with U.S. faculty and student peers, and for exposure to U.S. academic and classroom culture. Accommodation will be provided on-campus with U.S. peers.

Application Procedure:  Online [see link below]A complete application package includes: the application, copy of passport bio page, academic transcripts for years of university study (with English translations), two letters of reference (with English translations), and grade equivalence between local grading system and U.S. grading system.

The Global UGRAD Program is a U.S. Department of State sponsored initiative that grants scholarships to undergraduate level students from over 55 countries. Students are placed at colleges and universities across the United States where they participate in one semester of undergraduate, non-degree study.

Successful candidates will be notified of their award status by April 1, 2017 and World Learning, the cooperating agency will begin to provide placement and tentative arrival information in June 2017. Deadline 30 December 2017 Follow the link below to apply. Email help@campusmoments.org if you need help with your application or whatsapp +1.402.304.6540 

http://exchangeprograms.worldlearning.org/index.cfm?FuseAction=PublicDocuments.View&File_ID=060075757B773F7A7203047C0774751C0D09030F1A7B7077051C070475727C0705057376747571010D0D