Tag Archives: Campus

#HearMeToo: How Can I Deal With Sexual Harassment On Campus?

Staff Writer | Nust ZW
5 minute read

What is sexual harassment?

Sexual harassment includes any unwanted sexual behavior​—including touching or even making comments of a sexual nature. But sometimes the line can be blurred between teasing, flirting, and sexually harassing.

Do you know the difference between them? Take our  sexual harassment quiz and find out!

Sadly, sexual harassment doesn’t always stop when you graduate from school. However, if you develop the confidence and skills you need to deal with sexual harassment now, you’ll be prepared to deal with it when you enter the workforce. And you might even stop a harasser from hurting others!

What if I’m being sexually harassed?

Sexual harassment is more likely to stop if you know what it is and how to react to it! Consider three situations and how you might deal with each one.

SITUATION:

At work, some guys who were much older than I am kept telling me that I was beautiful and that they wished they were 30 years younger. One of them even walked up behind me and sniffed my hair!”​—Tabitha, 20.

Tabitha could think: ‘If I just ignore it and tough it out, maybe he will stop.’

Why that probably won’t help: Experts say that when victims ignore sexual harassment, it often continues and even escalates.

Try this instead: Speak up and calmly but clearly tell your harasser that you won’t tolerate his speech or behavior. “If anyone touches me inappropriately,” says 22-year-old Taryn, “I turn around and tell him not to touch me ever again. That usually catches the guy off guard.” If your harasser persists, be firm and don’t give up. When it comes to maintaining high moral standards, the Bible’s advice is: “Stand firm, mature and confident.”​—Colossians 4:​12The New Testament in Contemporary Language.

What if the harasser threatens to harm you? In that case, don’t confront him. Escape the situation as quickly as possible, and seek the help of a trusted adult.

SITUATION:

When I was in the sixth grade, two girls grabbed me in the hallway. One of them was a lesbian, and she wanted me to go out with her. Although I refused, they continued to harass me every day between classes. Once, they even pushed me up against a wall!”​—Victoria, 18.

Victoria could have thought: ‘If I tell anyone about this, I will be labeled as weak, and maybe no one will believe me.’

Why that thinking probably would not have helped: If you hold back from telling someone, the harasser may continue and even go on to harass others.​—Ecclesiastes 8:11.

Try this instead: Get help. Parents and teachers can give you the support you need to deal with your harasser. But what if the people you tell don’t take your complaint seriously? Try this: Every time you are harassed, write down the details. Include the date, time, and location of each incident, along with what the harasser said. Then give a copy of it to your parent or teacher. Many people treat a written complaint more seriously than a verbal one.

SITUATION:

I was really afraid of this one boy who was on the rugby team. He was almost two meters (6.5 ft) tall, and he weighed about 135 kilograms (300 lb)! He got it into his head that he was going to ‘have me.’ He pestered me almost every day​—for a whole year. One day, we were the only people in the classroom, and he started closing in on me. I jumped up and ran out the door.”​—Julieta, 18.

Julieta could think: ‘That’s just the way boys are.’

Why that probably won’t help: Your harasser is unlikely to change his behavior if everyone thinks it’s acceptable.

Try this instead: Resist the temptation to laugh it off or to respond with a smile. Rather, make sure that your reaction​—including your facial expression​—makes it clear to your harasser what you will and will not tolerate.

Sexual harassment quiz

“In middle school, boys would pull on the back of my bra and make derogatory comments​—like how much better I would feel once I had sex with them.”— Coretta.

Do you think that those boys were

  1. Teasing?

  2. Flirting?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

“On the bus, a boy started saying nasty things to me and grabbing me. I smacked his hand away and told him to move. He looked at me like I was crazy.”— Candice.

What do you think that this boy was doing to Candice?

  1. Teasing?

  2. Flirting?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

“Last year, a boy kept telling me that he liked me and that he wanted to go out with me, even though I constantly told him no. Sometimes, he rubbed my arm. I told him to stop, but he wouldn’t. Then, while I was tying my shoe, he smacked my rear end.”​— Bethany.

In your opinion, was this boy:

  1. Flirting?

  2. Teasing?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

The correct answer to all three questions is C.

What makes sexual harassment different from flirting or teasing? “Sexual harassment is one-sided,” says a girl named Eve. “It continues even when you tell the person to stop.” Harassment is serious. Not only can it affect your grades and health but it can also lead to sexual violence.

Curated from JW.ORG
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Students’ protests ‘Pfeeeeee’ as kombi fares hike

By Staff Reporters

2 minute read

As the economy continues to spiral out of control, with basic commodities’ prices shooting up, students haven’t been spared from the madness.

From the 50cents, that was already too high for them, UZ students woke up to find that there’ll be yet another adjustment to their budgets.

UZ students - byo 24
UZ students protests. Credit: bulawayo24.com

“Kana zvikanesta toenda netsoka” was the new slogan at the University of Zimbabwe today as students protested against the newly introduced kombi fares of 75 cents, which rendered their daily dollar deals obsolete, taking away the value a single dollar had in their lives.

Speaking to Campus Moments Magazine, a UZ student only identified as Tkay condemned the hike as daylight robbery, arguing that it was not consistent with their budgets.

“Its not fair you know, we are only students and are not working and we cant cope with these fares. My ‘coin’ has lost its value and my budget is already strained for me to squeeze out $1.50 for transport,” Tkay said.

In a short video in possession of this publication, students were chanting slogans and vowing to resort to walking than to pay the extra $0.50 cents for a return trip on top of the dollar they were used to paying

This challenge hit hard especially students who stay away from the college premises.

Another UZ student, Tariro Mandiri said, “I paid $0.75 today, they were not negotiating anything. I think we are the most affected and we wouldn’t have to worry about all this if we had enough accommodation in rez.”

According to Tawanda, a kombi driver who ferries UZ students, the ongoing economic crunch and fuel shortages in the country is what has necessitated their unwelcome review of prices.

combi pic
hararenews.co.zw

“If you look closely, as commuters, we have been reluctant to react to the ongoing economic challenge, but at the end of the day, we are in this for profits. Everything has gone up, and if we continue charging what we were charging, we would better park these vehicles,” said Tawanda.

Another kombi driver, Nicholas Chebvute argued that the fuel queues were also eating into their productive time, forcing them into the black market.

“To be frank, if we are to follow the queues, it would be hard to make anything,’ Chebvute said, “so we are forced to buy from the black market where a mere 5 litres costs $10 where as I could get the same at a very reasonable cost of about $7 but we are a time sensitive businesses and we cant spend more than an hour in a fuel queue because that is a complete trip.”

As the economy continues on a downward path, the students’ community has continued to press the government to take the necessary steps to abate the situation so as to save the future of the nation littered across colleges.

If you are student in college and would like to write on this platform, get in touch with us here: newsroom@campusmoments.org

Nust vice chancellor appointed

By Nqobile Tshili | Chronicle
PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa has appointed Professor Mqhele Dlodlo as National University of Science and Technology (Nust) Vice Chancellor with immediate effect.

Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development Minister, Prof Amon Murwira confirmed the appointment yesterday.

“We received confirmation from His Excellency. The appointment is with immediate effect. When he starts work that’s an issue of Chairman of Council Ambassador Zenzo Nsimbi,” said Prof Murwira.

The university has been operating without a substantive Vice Chancellor since the expiry of the late Prof Lindela Ndlovu’s contract in 2015.

The university’s Pro Vice-Chancellor Prof Samson Sibanda has been acting since then.

Prof Murwira said Prof Dlodlo has a mammoth task to address the challenges at Nust.

Nust has been experiencing some problems that have resulted in lecturers going on strike protesting against alleged mismanagement.

Prof Murwira said Government will fully support Prof Dlodlo to ensure that there are positive developments at Nust. “There is a lot of work to be done at Nust and we will support Prof Dlodlo to enable him to deliver. We should not spend our time bickering but we must deliver,” said Prof Murwira.

He said he was mindful of the fact that the absence of a substantive Vice Chancellor could have negatively affected the university’s operations and was confident the challenges facing the institution will soon be addressed.

Prof Dlodlo served as a principal lecturer and head of Electrical Craft Department at Bulawayo Polytechnic from 1983 to 1992.

In 2000, he joined Nust as a senior lecturer in the department of Electronic Engineering before being promoted to the post of Dean in the faculty of Industrial Technology from May 2002 to December 2003.

He joined the University of Cape Town as an Associate professor in January 2005 and also served as Assistant Dean in Internationalisation from January 2011 to December 2015. At the time of his appointment as Nust vice chancellor, Prof Dlodlo was still working in South Africa. — @nqotshili.

 

Campus News Round-Up: What You Might Have Missed This Week (4 – 10 February 2018)

Editorial Staff 

5 minute read

WINKY D delivered a stellar performance with his newly released album at the Nust Semester Welcome Bash at the  ceremonial hall in Bulawayo on Saturday night.

This came a day after he launched his much anticipated album Gombwe in Harare.

Local favourites, DJ Nospa and DJ Mzoe warmed up the stage for the Gafa.  They did not disappoint.

As expected the Ninja president and his Vigilance Band gave a spirited performance, blending the new and the old.

He performed songs from the new album that was launched on his birthday but nothing was new in terms of living up to expectations.

The album, which is a mixture of party and dance songs, has already proven to be a hit.

Those who did not make it to the HICC got their fair share of the Gafa’s worldclass act at Nust.

Winky D who got on stage at around half one launched his performance with old songs from previous albums with the crowd singing along throughout.

As if in trance the Disappear hit-maker performed his seemingly favourite song Ngirozi, from the new album featuring choral group, Vabati VaJehova, more than three times with the crowd responding well to the new gospel dance hall tune.

Winky D kept the students on their feet with songs like Toyi Toyi, Old School, Green Like Me Garden and Godo.

He left the stage at 3.30am yesterday and the crowd kept clamouring for more.

First Copy of Gombwe Sold For US$40 000

Businessman and socialite Genius “Ginimbi” Kadungure bought the first copy of Winky D’s latest album, Gombwe, for $40 000 during its launch on Friday night at the Harare International Conference Centre (HICC).

Ginimbi who is known for flaunting his wealth on social media wanted to buy the auctioned disc at $20 000 but he was forced to revise the initial amount after flamboyant Albert Ndabambi ‘outshined’ him by bidding the CD for $30 000.

Ginimbi dug deeper into his pockets forking another $20 000 to make it $40 000 in total.

At the end of the night, Winky D smiled all the way to the bank with a cool $70 000, a lump sum.- (Chronicle)

South Sudanese Students Go Green 

Midlands State University South Sudan Students, in conjunction with the National Forest Commission, embarked on a tree planting exercise at the Graduate School of Business Leadership campus on the 30th of January 2018.

The exercise aimed at creating a vibrant and healthy environment for the students and the surrounding communities.

The project coordinator, Kan Gueh Kan Lapdhor, highlighted that the initiative was driven by the ideals of Zimbabwe’s National Tree Planting Day which is held annually in December.

27540218_1508374919260138_3398205114701677178_n

Ladphor said the initiative was meant to improve the learning, working and living environment for Midlands State University and the surrounding community as trees provide clean air.

“The role of trees on the planet is comparable to that of lungs in human beings. Therefore, it is imperative to plant trees at our University to improve the living conditions of human beings and bring balance to the ecosystem through the production of clean air,” said Kan.

The Midlands State University International Relations Office also highlighted that this initiative came as a result of the need to join the world in combating global warming which has affected most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.

International Relations Office representative, Qinisani Bhebe, weighed in on the tree planting initiative by highlighting its contribution towards the reduction of global warming.

Mr Ilunga, representing the Student Affairs Division, applauded the efforts made by the Midlands State University International students towards creating a green environment.

Ilunga went on to thank the National Forest Commission for the donation of two hundred and fifty trees.

“As the Student Affairs Division, we would like to commend the South Sudan students for coming up and implementing an initiative that would help preserve our environment.”

This tree planting initiative is also going to leave a lasting legacy of their courtesy not only towards Midlands State University but the nation at large.

This tree planting exercise shall be an ongoing process at Midlands State University as the International students scale up their fight against global warming to make this world a better place to live in.- (MSU Facebook)

Govt to review harsh media laws

“Zimbabwe was one of the first countries to introduce legislation on access to information-the AIPPA Act, but unfortunately, AIPPA is better in prohibiting access to information than in facilitating it,” 

 

Government says it is in the process of aligning media laws with the constitution as well as reviewing some laws that impede the smooth operation of the media.

The media is Zimbabwe is operating under harsh conditions which have seen various journalists being arrested for stories they would have written and also failing to access information from public institutions.

Speaking at the launch of the European Union and Norwegian government funded Media and Elections Program, Acting Minister of Information, Media and Broadcasting Services Simon Khaya-Moyo said work is already under way to align the laws.

“At policy level, the Ministry of Information is in the process of aligning the two pieces of media legislation that fall within its purview that is the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA) and the Broadcasting Services Act (BSA) with the constitution, they must be aligned with the constitution and we are working expeditiously to ensure this is accomplished.

“The ministry is also alive to the fact that there are other laws that affect the media and continues to engage with other government stakeholders to ensure that we create a more favourable working environment for the media,” he said.

Simon Khaya Moyo

Speaking at the same occasion Head of European Union Delegation to Zimbabwe, Ambassador Philippe Van Damme said if the media is to play its role of reinforcing accountability then the stringent laws must be address as matter of urgent.

“If we want the media to full play their role of informing public debate and reinforcing scrutiny and accountability of electoral and democratic processes, the issues will need to be addressed, not only through the legal framework, but also in the way the laws are effectively applied.

“Zimbabwe was one of the first countries to introduce legislation on access to information-the AIPPA Act, but unfortunately, as you all know, AIPPA is better in prohibiting access to information than in facilitating it,” he said.

Ambassador Van Damme added that the media is also constrained in its watchdog role by harsh economic conditions and general lack of professional skills and deontological standards.

He said the media is also constrained by threats from politicians or other wealthy and/or well-connected individuals under the investigations.- (Daniel Chingundu/Open Parly ZW)

#We’R’OnIt AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON CAMPUS BECAUSE IT’S ON US

Only five out of more than 20 tertiary institutions in #Zimbabwe have sexual harassment policies. #We’R’OnIt and demand that all higher learning centers enact such policies by November 2017

Let’s orange the world and help eradicate violence against women.

TOO EMBARRASSED TO SHARE, BUT BECAUSE I CARE WILL SHARE IT INSTEAD!!

Don’t people have a decency to at least pretend like they adhere to certain commemorations which speak directly to the woman? It’s not like we are asking for something which may go beyond a month of sustaining this pretense. Here I am sitting in a full kombi, the usual ‘four- four formation’. Just before my eyes, I witness a sliding door operator(hwindi) insulting a woman for standing her ground and frankly not accepting coins as her change after paying her bus fare. I did not interfere  and try to play  hero in someone else’s fight due to fear of being left stranded in the middle of nowhere. Was it her fight entirely?

By Duduzile Mathema| Nust-Zw | @MathemaDuduzile

I quiver in anger at the thought of my selfish act at the time, but what could I have done?? It’s not like I would have been dropped off and I would have called my notorious brother to settle the score with the conductor on my behalf. At this moment and time as I reflect, I come to a realisation that all this transpired during the 16 days of activism against gender based violence. Where were the other women such as myself? As I hinted on our pretence earlier on,  I just wish that if only one of us, ‘women’, could have had the courage to speak for that lady maybe she would not have left the Kombi thinking that she is just a mere non-entity.

Here I am thinking that when women’s rights are being violated especially during these 16 days against gender based violence, it is all narrowed down to the domestic violence where the man is always the villain. The one to brutally bash the wife for not conforming to the duties which are expected of her. At heart, I am an activist who learnt a lesson today, that I hardly understand the concept of gender based violence. Embarrassing as it may sound, I desire for my fellow women at large to be aware of men or other women who sought to hurt them in ways which may go against the objectives of the 16 days of Activism against Gender Based violence.

According to the Zimbabwe Demography Health Survey (ZDHS) of 2015 34.8% of women are reported to have experienced violence in their lifetime. The ZDHS explains that violence of women is bound to happen regardless of geographical location, status, level of education and time. In as much as women who have received tertiary education are exonerated from the list of the abused, ZDHS of 2015 affirms that 1 in every 5 women is a victim even if she may be educated.

From 25 November 2016, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against women, to 10 December 2016, Human Rights Day, the 16 Days of Activism against Gender based Violence Campaign is a time to incite action to end violence against women and girls around the world.  “Orange the World: Raise Money to End Violence against Women and Girls”  is the theme for this year’s campaign. With education being at the core of this year’s campaign, women and children should not suffer any deprivation in terms of receiving education about the various forms of gender based violence which is usually inflicted on women. In the 2016 Action Kit the aspect of education has been disintegrated into the following criteria: non-discrimination and equality, right to information, best interest of the child, academic freedom, advanced levels of education, human rights education, technical and  vocational education, free and compulsory basic level education to all, freedom to choose and establish academic institutions.

The narration which came up at the beginning shows how women can suffer at the hands of the general community and yet nothing is done. The type of abuse that this woman was exposed to is psychological abuse. She let the conductor insult her whilst the majority of the women in the kombi did nothing to save the victim. What does it reflect on us as women?

However, in as much women are victims of gender based violence, it is necessary to make an observation of the fact that societal structures have a role to play in moulding such behaviours. Patriarchy is still prevalent within our society and women are considered as inferior beings as compared to men. Therefore, from the anecdote highlighted earlier, the victim may have tried to defend her actions but because she was having exchange of words with a man, she somehow lost the argument.

People have adopted a mentality of being self-absorbed in their own affairs at the expense of someone in dire need of assistance. When the conductor was in his moment of glory whilst humiliating this woman,none of the women in the kombi bothered to make the woman’s issue their own. Some continued in their conversations as though all was normal.

Putting the issue to rest, there are a few recommendations that I propose as a way of helping bring a reduction to the escalating figures of violence in Zimbabwe. Since I witnessed an act of abuse in a kombi, I believe that with all things being normal there is need for ALL taxis to have call lines where victims can be able to report cases of abuse so that they may be dealt with. During this time of the year whereby gender based violence is brewing in people’s kitchens, advocacy levels should be increased. Social media can be used for the greater good to push the message about gender based violence. Pastors in churches can further this campaign through speaking about it in their various denominations. Community dialogue could be heightened so that people can receive education about gender based violence.

Let’s orange it and help eradicate gender based violence.

Duduzile Michelle Zinzi Mathema is a Part 3 Student from the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) studying Journalism and Media Studies.

Zimbabwe students fighting GBV on campus

Sex Rights Africa Network | @SexRightsAfrica

When female students at tertiary colleges and universities in Zimbabwe call for action against gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual harassment (SH) on campus, they need up-to-date statistics to back up their claims that this is a widespread problem.

Research undertaken by the Female Students Network Trust (FSNT) in Zimbabwe in 2015 presents a clear picture of the nature and extent of GBV and SH that students endure, and make recommendations for protecting survivors and holding perpetrators and authorities accountable for the abuse.

FSNT’s baseline study, conducted in universities, polytechnics and teachers’ colleges, with support from the Czech Embassy and the Students and Academics International Help Fund, covered ten tertiary institutions and included 3425 students and staff. It confirmed the students’ claims that GBV and SH were ‘rampant’ on campus, particularly sexual harassment of female students by male lecturers, fellow male students and non-academic male employees.

Key findings from the research include:

Of the 2114 female students who participated through the questionnaire, 94% reported having encountered SH, compared to 3% of the 672 male students;

    Of the 1987 female students who had encountered SH:

        16% of female students said they had been raped by male students and 5% had been raped by male lecturers and non-academic staff;

        13% of female students reported date rape in relationships with older men (lecturers and non-academic staff) and 46% in relationships with male students;

        16% reported having been forced into unprotected sex in sexual encounters with lecturers; 10% in sexual encounters with non-academic staff and 43% with male students;

        32% of female students reported having been coerced into drinking alcohol or injecting drugs by older men (lecturers and non-academic staff) during date outings and thereafter sexual assaulted. 48% of female students reported the same during date outings with male students;

        64% of male students said they had given money or gifts in exchange for sex in the last year and 42% of female students reported that they had received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the last year. (In focus group discussions, men said that having ‘invested’ in female students they would resort to violence if their partners refused to have sex with them or had sex with someone else);

        85% of respondents reported knowing female students who were once forced by campus-men to abort an unintended pregnancy;

        74% of female students encountered offers of ‘favours’ (good grades/marks, extra academic help and study aids) by lecturers and 83% encountered offers of ‘favours’ (food, accommodation, transport and money) by non-academic staff and students, all in exchange for sex or sexual relationships;

        67% experienced unwanted physical contact (touching, patting and hugging) by lecturers, non-academic staff and students;

        93% experienced inappropriate remarks about their gender and sexuality (including sarcastic criticism of their weight, body parts such as breasts and buttocks, skin complexion, hairdo, cosmetics, dressing) by mostly male students;

        91% encountered wolf whistling – and of the 672 male students who completed the questionnaire, 90% reported having wolf whistled at a female student;

        79% of female students reported being intentionally excluded from meetings and processes because they were being held at gender insensitive environments and times.

The vast majority (94%) of female students who experienced GBV or SH said that they would not report to the authorities. Most (63.5%) said they had disclosed to someone (family member, friend, intimate partner, room mate, fellow church member).

The main reason given for not reporting was not knowing how to do so. However, female students also reported that campus security were more concerned about preventing student unrest that dealing with issues of GBV and SH.

Reporting to intimate partners seldom resulted in cases being taken up through the college/university system and would often result in physical gang fights between involved males. Female students said that being identified as victims of GBV and SH through reporting would jeopardise their current and future intimate relations and social image, and subject them to campus gossip and further male student bullying.

Responses to questions about the reasons for GBV and SH reflect an entrenched patriarchal culture, with fixed, unequal gender norms and normalised victim-blaming. Both female and male students said wolf-whistling was due to young women wearing tight or revealing clothing. The males said they were less likely to wolf-whistle at students who dressed ‘decently’. The main reason given for unwanted physical contact by both male and female respondents was that female students had ‘unknowingly sent a wrong message’ to offenders, who were generally people they knew.

 The study found that ‘female students fail to live their college lives fully making unreasonable behavioral and life style adjustments fully because of fear of SH in their living and learning environments’.

 However, it seemed this strategy would be unlikely to protect them since male students reported intense pressure – from both male and female lecturers – to outperform female students, to show contempt, competition and indifference towards female students, and to call a male who did not perform ‘woman’. Female students who outperformed males would be called tom-boys or labelled as having ‘balls’. Some female students would behave in a submissive way to avoid this.

 Both male and female students during FGDs said that male lecturers viewed sex with female students as part of their supplementary job benefits just like medical aid in the context of low and often delayed salaries. Male lecturers in interviews denied this though they said it was part of beer talk. A high proportion of male lecturers said female students ‘enticed them’ into relationships.

The report notes that there have been some efforts by the Zimbabwe government to demonstrate its commitment to eradicating GBV and SH Government – for example the creation of a separate ministry responsible for gender and women affairs, which has put in place a national GBV strategy.

FSNT has used the findings of the study to formulate a Sexual Harassment Monitoring Mechanism (SHMM) for tertiary institutions and to provide recommendations for improving accountability of authorities on GBV. FSNT

 Director Evernice Munando says the Trust has been advocating and lobbying strongly for SH policy formulation and effective implementation, engaging Zimbabwe’s parliamentary portfolio committees on Gender and Education to expedite the processes. Munando reported in April 2016: “Some universities and colleges are responding well [and] Midlands State University (MSU) has recently made its policy.”

 Let’s orange Campuses and advocate to stop Sexual Harassment 

 Article first published on 04 May 2016 at http://www.sexrightsafrica.net

Video published by ItsOnUsCampaign

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