Category Archives: Opinion

Why 92% of #Twimbos think Robert Mugabe University is a misplaced priority

92% of Zimbabweans on twitter think that the proposed $1 billion dollar university in honour of  Robert Mugabe is misplaced, according to our poll.

Here are some of the reasons why citizens are against the initiative:

However, the Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education Prof Jonathan Moyo justified the Robert Mugabe university saying:

Furthermore…

The few who sympathised with cabinet’s decision to grant quarter of the nation’s budget to build the institution said:

See more below:

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The essence of culture and heritage: identity

“There is need to share with young citizens and educate them about heritage and culture as symbols of national identity and common wealth for all ethnic groups …”

by Tsungai Mhungu

People seem to forget who they are, the basis of their identity and where they come from. Change is bound to take place but continuity of culture is essential, it is heritage.

You will see that as a particular culture becomes unique, it becomes important and a marker of identity of that one group while other cultures are swept away by change owing to exchange of ideas and new preferences in terms of lifestyles in a global village.

However, no matter how prevalent change is, the word culture or heritage can never be swept away. What only lacks is the practical part, hence heritage awareness and education becomes critical

Promoting heritage awareness is equally important as safeguarding our identity. Raising Heritage and Cultural awareness has become vital especially in a fast globalizing world that we now live in and which threaten the survival of these two aspects of our social fabric as a country and as Africa as a whole.

We all know what it means when we talk about a global village, where some cultures are becoming less important and fading away as people are adopting foreign cultures and disregarding their heritage.

This could be because of uneven distribution of heritage awareness and other heritage programs across Zimbabwe owing to criteria, variability in resource availability and accessibility to different areas of the country.

This, however, is a challenge that can be curbed with dedicated effort and resources including professionally trained heritage personnel.

It is common and generally known and, may be, accepted that remote areas are less prioritized and far much disadvantaged in terms of accessibility of critical Heritage and cultural information.

It should be of concern that the urban counterparts of the remote areas have an upper hand than the later because of easy access to and availability of information, technology and heritage centers which allows them to learn more about heritage than their remote colleagues.

Usually culture and heritage are looked at from a touristic point of view (their value to outsiders) and not from conservative point of view where priority is given to posterity (so that future generations also enjoy the heritage) than their economic merits or striking a balance between the two.

This is a language only known to professionals but should be shared to all stakeholders of our cultures and heritage so that it becomes vivid to them the value of what we are trying to protect.

The provisions of the 1972 and 2003 UNESCO conventions are tools that need to be embraced and put into practice because of their recognition of the significance of heritage and the dangers that are posed by both natural and cultural events.

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The Inaugural African World Heritage Youth Forum in Roben Island, Cape Town-2016 is an example of efforts to support the effective conservation and protection of natural and cultural heritage of outstanding universal value in Africa.

I understand that Zimbabwe is a member state of the UNESCO and ratified the conventions that seek to protect culture and heritage.

This therefore suggests that heritage awareness and education is remedial to our concerns as heritage professionals.

As a country we should also learn from activities like the Bosnian heritage awareness program with the Foundation Cultural Heritage without Borders (CHWB) to show the importance of heritage for a better future.

Our concern as Heritage Professionals is further exacerbated by the recently introduced curriculum which includes Heritage studies.

With the same appreciation and respect for this initiative by the ministry of education to promote heritage and culture in Zimbabwean schools, especially faced with the fast globalizing world where heritage and cultural principles are fast being washed away and disappearing, there is, however, the need for the professionally trained heritage teachers to undertake this initiative.

The status quo in this field is inopportune taking into cognizance that heritage studies teaching stuff is borrowed from other disciplines such as History.

This under mines the very same goal that the ministry is trying to archive and also undermines heritage facts that are being compromised by the opinionated dissemination of data to students.

Our goal is to promote culture and heritage.

Culture and heritage are most important in defining a country’s identity.

It is therefore critical at this stage to engage professional heritage and cultural practitioners to equip teachers with authentic and professional information so that students are prepared not only to sit for culture and heritage studies exams with confidence but also to raise conscientiousness in students and youths in general towards culture and heritage.

There is need to share with young citizens and educate them about heritage and culture as symbols of national identity, common wealth for all ethnic groups and liberation heritage.

Such endorses national unity, Heritage laws of Zimbabwe, global laws and conventions as well as the national heritage and cultural custodian, the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe (NMMZ) and other organizations that play pivotal roles in culture and Heritage.

The bottom line is that preserving our national heritage safe guards our identity as a country.

Featured Image: Amagugu International Heritage Centre.

 

UZ Chancellor AU donation could have paid fees for 2000 students

Press Release|Zinasu Information Department| University of Zimbabwe

President Mugabe’s 1 million dollar donation to the African Union which sent tongues wagging this week could have paid school fees for at least 2 000 students, the Zimbabwe National Students’ Union (Zinasu) has claimed.

This comes after medicine students recently held protests over their inability to pay high fees at the University of Zimbabwe(UZ), leading to the arrest and detention of several student leaders, among them Zinasu spokesperson Zivai Mhetu and UZ Students’ Union treasurer  general Ignatious Mukwichi and secretary for sports Kudakwashe Guta.

President Mugabe, who also doubles as the UZ Chancellor, could have used the 1 million to pay fees for 2 000 struggling students at the biggest university in the country if he really had their plight at heart, Zinasu spokeperson, Mr Zivai Mhetu, said.

Not more than a week ago students were up in arms at UZ because they are unable to pay the increasingly unaffordable tuition fees only to hear that their Chancellor is giving away 1 million dollars to the AU as if he has dealt with all the problems affecting people in his own country.

“Donations should be made by the Bill Gates of this world who have more money than they can spend not Heads of States of impoverished countries whose citizens are wallowing in abject poverty and absolute misery said Mhetu”

Fees for general programmes at UZ were around five hundred dollars meaning that had he chosen to, Mugabe could have paid fees for at least 2 000 students at the institution, many of whom are being forced to defer their studies or drop out completely because of their inability to pay fees.

Countless students are being forced to drop out of school, not at the UZ alone but countrywide. It is against this background that we have been clamouring for grants and loans. But instead of giving us grants and loans the Head of our government and all State Universities is busy dishing out money to international organizations as if he is a one-man donor agency competing with the US-Aid.” said Mhetu.

Students at the tertiary level in Zimbabwe have been dropping out of school en masse due to economic hardships with Zinasu claiming that 12 000 students dropped out of school countrywide in the first quarter of 2016 alone.

Top 10 Companies for Internship in Zimbabwe?

Staff Blogger | Africa University

After reading @prowl_magazine’s #TopTenTuesday (yes we love to read magazines other than our own) we have curated their twitter story here. It may give you ideas where to look if you are yet to go on attachment. Feel free to add other companies to the list. 

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TWO

THREE

FOUR

FIVE

SIX

 

SEVEN 

EIGHT

NINE

TEN 

5 things you must do to secure attachment in 2017

by Lesley Tinashe Maniwa | Nust-ZW | image creds: stocksnap.io

Finding a place for attachment in Zimbabwe has become a hustle, and being a college student in Zimbabwe, I have had my fair share of experiences which I have found useful and can be shared to help you on your quest to get industrial attachment.

The industrial attachment or the internship is usually a period of 8 months of work related learning experience for a student that was designed by colleges in Zimbabwe and other countries world over. The aim of the Industrial attachment period is to equip and prepare students to be fit for the corporate world. It is part of the requirements of what students have to go through before they are released as a complete product upon graduation.

1. Appreciate that you don’t have much choice

Most students get it wrong when they tend to believe that they have a choice when it comes to companies they want to be attached to. However, in Zimbabwe it can be very dangerous because that same spot you want, is also wanted by thousands of other students too. Every student has a big company name in his or her mind. Everyone wants to be attached at big companies like Econet, Zesa, Old Mutual, CBZ Holdings, ZimPlats, Mimosa, CABS, Delta Beverages, Innscor amongst others. 

 Remove your focus on these big names my friend. I believe that as a student the only option you have is to cast your net wide that way you will never miss it. You may not always get your dream attachment place.

Take this classical situation: at first students will be shunning the Government Institutions just because most of them don’t pay interns. However, when all your options have turned out to be unfruitful, time is ticking and then you will see that you don’t have an option but to go to the government and beg for a place so that you can be able to progress with your studies.

My advice to you is that cast your net wide.  If something comes up on your way take it even if it’s not what you wanted, take it. Something will always come up and you can change.

The first attachment job I got was at one company in Chinhoyi. they gave me an offer, and I accepted.  The the HR Manager said, “…if you get a better option Lesley you can always change.” Within the next 2 weeks I got other offers and I had to choose the one which was best for me.  

2. Create connections or networks

One thing that am sure will work for you are connections, that I’m 100% sure of.

To those due for attachment starting July 2017, I am sure that by now you should have created connections with the following groups of people.

Students who are going for attachment and those coming from attachment. Your colleagues who are currently on attachment will link you up with their bosses and it can be easy for you to get a place for attachment.

Your lecturers and college industrial liaison. Lecturers play a major role when it comes to finding a place for attachment, for your information, 90% of the interviews I attended were organized by my school lecturers. I just got calls from companies inviting me for interviews and I could not remember sending my CVs to the companies but my lecturers and the college did a great job for me and I really appreciate.

Your relatives, family friends, church colleagues, this may sound awkward and corrupt but believe me if you have a relative who has a high post or links to companies that you wish to be attached to, then you have to make use of them. Keep in touch with them and they can help you out.

3. Work for good grades.

I know that when we are at college we will be busy fooling each other saying that distinctions don’t matter what matters is just passing. If you are one of those people who subscribe to that then you need to change your mentality because good passes do matter companies do need students with distinctions.

If you have good passes, chances are high that you will secure a place for attachment at your dream organisation. It’s simple, work hard, play hard.

4. Do your applications on time

It should go without saying, but you should find out when the companies that you wish to apply to will be taking a new group of attachés.

Once you have the information make sure you send your applications on time so that you won’t miss the opportunity. (You can even send in application in advance)

5. Pray

Prayer is the most important thing in everything you do; it is a way of communicating to God. Pray to God tell him what you want and he will surely answer you. Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. Philippians 4:6

Obtaining a place for attachment doesn’t have to be an overly stressful experience. I hope the tips I have shared with you will help you.

Lesley is a final year Human Resources Management Student at National University of Science and Technology and can be contacted +263771 191 863, you can also follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Let’s orange the world and help eradicate violence against women.

TOO EMBARRASSED TO SHARE, BUT BECAUSE I CARE WILL SHARE IT INSTEAD!!

Don’t people have a decency to at least pretend like they adhere to certain commemorations which speak directly to the woman? It’s not like we are asking for something which may go beyond a month of sustaining this pretense. Here I am sitting in a full kombi, the usual ‘four- four formation’. Just before my eyes, I witness a sliding door operator(hwindi) insulting a woman for standing her ground and frankly not accepting coins as her change after paying her bus fare. I did not interfere  and try to play  hero in someone else’s fight due to fear of being left stranded in the middle of nowhere. Was it her fight entirely?

By Duduzile Mathema| Nust-Zw | @MathemaDuduzile

I quiver in anger at the thought of my selfish act at the time, but what could I have done?? It’s not like I would have been dropped off and I would have called my notorious brother to settle the score with the conductor on my behalf. At this moment and time as I reflect, I come to a realisation that all this transpired during the 16 days of activism against gender based violence. Where were the other women such as myself? As I hinted on our pretence earlier on,  I just wish that if only one of us, ‘women’, could have had the courage to speak for that lady maybe she would not have left the Kombi thinking that she is just a mere non-entity.

Here I am thinking that when women’s rights are being violated especially during these 16 days against gender based violence, it is all narrowed down to the domestic violence where the man is always the villain. The one to brutally bash the wife for not conforming to the duties which are expected of her. At heart, I am an activist who learnt a lesson today, that I hardly understand the concept of gender based violence. Embarrassing as it may sound, I desire for my fellow women at large to be aware of men or other women who sought to hurt them in ways which may go against the objectives of the 16 days of Activism against Gender Based violence.

According to the Zimbabwe Demography Health Survey (ZDHS) of 2015 34.8% of women are reported to have experienced violence in their lifetime. The ZDHS explains that violence of women is bound to happen regardless of geographical location, status, level of education and time. In as much as women who have received tertiary education are exonerated from the list of the abused, ZDHS of 2015 affirms that 1 in every 5 women is a victim even if she may be educated.

From 25 November 2016, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against women, to 10 December 2016, Human Rights Day, the 16 Days of Activism against Gender based Violence Campaign is a time to incite action to end violence against women and girls around the world.  “Orange the World: Raise Money to End Violence against Women and Girls”  is the theme for this year’s campaign. With education being at the core of this year’s campaign, women and children should not suffer any deprivation in terms of receiving education about the various forms of gender based violence which is usually inflicted on women. In the 2016 Action Kit the aspect of education has been disintegrated into the following criteria: non-discrimination and equality, right to information, best interest of the child, academic freedom, advanced levels of education, human rights education, technical and  vocational education, free and compulsory basic level education to all, freedom to choose and establish academic institutions.

The narration which came up at the beginning shows how women can suffer at the hands of the general community and yet nothing is done. The type of abuse that this woman was exposed to is psychological abuse. She let the conductor insult her whilst the majority of the women in the kombi did nothing to save the victim. What does it reflect on us as women?

However, in as much women are victims of gender based violence, it is necessary to make an observation of the fact that societal structures have a role to play in moulding such behaviours. Patriarchy is still prevalent within our society and women are considered as inferior beings as compared to men. Therefore, from the anecdote highlighted earlier, the victim may have tried to defend her actions but because she was having exchange of words with a man, she somehow lost the argument.

People have adopted a mentality of being self-absorbed in their own affairs at the expense of someone in dire need of assistance. When the conductor was in his moment of glory whilst humiliating this woman,none of the women in the kombi bothered to make the woman’s issue their own. Some continued in their conversations as though all was normal.

Putting the issue to rest, there are a few recommendations that I propose as a way of helping bring a reduction to the escalating figures of violence in Zimbabwe. Since I witnessed an act of abuse in a kombi, I believe that with all things being normal there is need for ALL taxis to have call lines where victims can be able to report cases of abuse so that they may be dealt with. During this time of the year whereby gender based violence is brewing in people’s kitchens, advocacy levels should be increased. Social media can be used for the greater good to push the message about gender based violence. Pastors in churches can further this campaign through speaking about it in their various denominations. Community dialogue could be heightened so that people can receive education about gender based violence.

Let’s orange it and help eradicate gender based violence.

Duduzile Michelle Zinzi Mathema is a Part 3 Student from the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) studying Journalism and Media Studies.

LIFE HACK: VOTER APATHY & WHY IT IS A PROBLEM

By Crispen Rateiwa| Nust-ZW

 So many  issues affect students, yet a few cast votes effectively surrendering power and overall decision making to a small student segment 

What are the effects of voter apathy? How does boycotting participation in student council elections affect our welfare? Why are youths taking this right to choose a representative through ballot casting for granted?  What can be done to increase the level of voter participation? The more students understand the benefits of voting in student elections, the more increase in the level of voter participation.

Colleges and universities are places were election reform and systems could be studied and tested. Each academic year student representative council (SRC) elections are held. However, there is widespread low voter turnout characteristic of the national electoral system. Voting is a duty, but people ignore this and a scant percent of eligible voters cast ballots.

The present and future generation of students should learn to value and enjoy democracy. In the first and second Chimurenga, Zimbabweans successfully fought for freedom ideals and principles. The greatest barrier to voting is the lack of patriotism in a majority of young adults. Students should revisit history and understand that in the second Chimurenga, the black majority fought for one man one vote – voting as the ability to use our voices, to make things happen.

Anyone who has interest in their welfare should care about politics. When the biggest student segment fails to take part in elections, they automatically surrender their entire academic year welfare to the student council elected by a small segment. What this means is the elected council will only serve, consult and do what pleases its voter constituency thereby sidelining issues and views relevant to the majority students. It is almost as if they don’t exist at all, as long as they don’t mobilize and force the student council to listen to them. Voter apathy affect students in all spheres of life.

Generally, only about 25% of students cast their votes in student council elections. What could be the reason? Is it issueless campaigns? Is it an insufficient electoral system? Is it because they are uninformed and uninterested? Surely, if there is no good candidate, why can not one field themselves for the posts? Many students claim that their courses do not allow much time for extra-curricular activities such as voting. When asked why they do not vote, many people report that they have too little free time. Some may argue that incumbency advantage and student representative council unresponsiveness to constituent desires is enough to deter even the most politically conscience person from voting. The right to vote is not seen as powerful, it is seen as pointless. However, students need to know that voices really can change the system.

Just like in national elections, student politics conforms to a pattern that whoever has the most money and big business support will have the best ads and with them, an improved public image. The vote is not seen as influential, as it does not translate to genuine student representation. This leads to elected student representative council unresponsiveness to constituent desires, but to their sponsors. Many voters are discouraged that their views are not represented by their elected student representatives, and consequently, that they have no real power in their student council.

“I feel politicians are fake, they claim to represent us. Actually, they represent powerful business people and politicians who sponsor their colourful public campaigns. Some get bribed when they get influential positions” said a NUST student, on condition of anonymity.

vote-initiative

What must be done?

The desire to vote is one that needs to be taught. Tertiary level students need education on political matters so that they differentiate propaganda and buzzwords and focus on reality of issues at hand when they vote. Political awareness or voter education in school need to be established in order for university and college youths to participate politically. Thus, students need the important message that their vote matters and as soon as they start to vote they are more likely to continue voting, as they grow older.

A needlessly archaic voting procedure that creates barriers to voting should be dealt with. Internet voting would increase voting by drastic standards. University students have excellent access to computers and enjoy using them. Online voting would be an excellent means by which to not only simplify the process, but increase its accessibility as well. Internet voting provides a great deal of ease for voters, allowing them to vote from the comfort of their home or even from a dorm room. Telephone voting, early voting, and absentee voting can also be considered for those who have difficulty making it to the polls. Schools, libraries, and work places all have internet access. These plausible and indispensable alternatives skyrockets voting availability. Students on attachment can also vote! Aren’t they also paying fees?

Voting can be made fun and rewarding through multimedia. Internet graphics, pictures, and sounds can attract young, first time voters in tertiary institutions. The internet has become a useful resource and (powerful) advertising tool for many political candidates. Politicians need to court virgin voters through new information technology. Advertising campaign and candidate information web sites could increase issue awareness; thereby, getting young people excited about voting.  Politicians should successfully run engaging social media handles such as facebook, twitter, youtube and Instagram.

Since all paid up university students are eligible to vote, they would be expected to vote. At university, a student identity card qualifies one to vote in student council polls. Fines should be enacted upon those who do not show up at polls on election day. After an election is held, voter checklists should be monitored for no-show voters, and these persons should be sent a notice for a fine. Should this fine not be paid within a set time limit, these non-voters would face a disciplinary hearing for a more significant punishment.

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In order to aid voters to follow through with their constitutional right, and avoid fines, universities and colleges must provide transportation to all eligible students, especially those learning in places away from the main campus to the polls at no expense. To eliminate excuses many non-voters give such as the burdensomeness to travel to polls, transportations is necessary.

To increase voter turnout there is need to eliminate wasted votes. In order to assure the electorate that their vote counts, the electoral system should allow vote casting according to the voter preferences. The voter will mark against his or her best five candidates in order of the first choice to the last fifth choice. This system more accurately targets the student’s choice for the student council. Instead of voting for just one candidate, a voter would rank them in preference. Therefore, if a voter’s first choice for office has no chance of attaining a majority of the vote, the voter’s second choice would receive the vote. This style of voting system would especially attract young voters, giving them reassurance that their vote will not be wasted if they don’t initially vote with a mainstream political candidate or party. This ensures limited cases of vote boycotts as the outcome remains unpredictable.

Proportional representation makes elections more exciting to the electorate because their voice and vote will make a difference. For example, a 50/ 50 gender representation in student elections encourages both men and women to vote; everyone would be fairly represented according to his or her vote. A system of unequal representation has mainly sidelined women.

Political conscience is important and institutions should provide credible platforms that allows issue-based campaigns and ideology based campaigns to take center stage during election period so that the electorate make informed decisions in the ballot box. There is need to aim for 100 percent voter turnout to avoid situations where politicians generate benefits for those who vote, and mostly ignore those who don’t. Strong media coverage and public debate provide the best means to distinguish between candidates. Both campus print and broadcasting media should contribute free airtime to every student political candidate.

Conclusion

The more the rise in voter turnouts and youth participation in student representative council (SRC) elections, the more representative the council is of the people.  So many political, academic, social, economic and technological issues affect students, yet a few cast votes thereby surrendering power and overall decision making to a small student segment throughout the academic year.

If only the middle – and upper- income students turn out at the polls, student politicians can concentrate on the issues pertaining to that group of people. Lower – income and working- class student views will be trashed. Implementation of programs such as internet voting, better voter education, and an election day holiday are necessary to fight voter apathy. Other notable point, although debatable is making voting compulsory, which has a direct and dramatic effect on turnout. Last but not least, there should be more secure polling stations.

Crispen Rateiwa is the chairperson of College Youth Art Club and president of Democratic Alliance for Academic (DAA). He is a publishing studies student at National University of Science and Technology. You can contact him on crisrateiwa@gmail.com. This article only focuses on student elections in tertiary institutions. You can read more articles by him on ayaasite.wordpress.com

 

OF WHAT USE ARE OUR DEGREES THEN?

by Sineke Sibanda

I’m so thrilled that for one of the few times as a country we have been able to construct or rather fix another road other than the common patches that we are used to, when patching potholes which make it hell to drive on anyway. Keep it up minister Joram Gumbo, you have done well.

I’m however worried with the kind of faith that our current administration has shown towards its people, its structures, its institutions and above all its future, the graduated youth. Apart from feeling betrayed that they school their own children in other countries to increase their chances of being international employees, I’m insulted that they have totally shunned opportunities for the ordinary people too.

Just a few days ago, they were banning imported property for the very reason that there is need to promote local property but surprisingly, today they are themselves importing ‘intellectual’ property from China to come and do a road construction for the Harare-Beit Bridge-Chirundu highway. A clear picture that for the past years our teaching stuff has been vainly working towards producing theoretical idiots that are incapable of doing something practical for their country. I do not have the statistics of how many personnel we have drooled out of colleges with expertise in the built industry, architecture, civil engineering etc. but I’m sure there are skilled people in the country who studied the relevant bit and could carry the project.

The worst betrayal you can feel as a college student under this administration apart from the fateful drought of jobs is when they show you that your degree is useless and cannot move your country forward. This actually tells an interesting tale, a sorrowful song that we are not good enough for the jobs they promised. You tend to wonder, to whom the promised two million jobs were for? The Chinese or the locals? If it’s the indigenous Taku or Sihle of Zimbabwe, then which jobs, digging the road and wheelbarrowing around a half-ton of wet cement? It is said the project given to Chinese based China Harbour Engineering Company will create about 300 000 employment opportunities, but which kind of jobs? It’s not the indigenous Zimbabwean in the lead, despite all the professed qualifications.

I don’t know if this doesn’t tell you a story about our education system. The common story here is that our education system has been turned into a commercial entity than a country building developmental lifelong project. We are still learning to be employees and our government endorses that. It is for this reason that our government has ignored the whole fairy tale that we are the most schooled in Africa. I call it a fairy tale because a fairy tale is a creative story of things that cannot be touched or felt but only imagined. If it was a reality, our government would be contracting us to do the jobs other than look elsewhere for expertise. So what is the meaning of going to college if a group of people are imported from China to do the exact same things we have been taught in college?

Above: Jobless Zimbabwe University Graduates  taking a rather innovative protest stance against worsening economic situation in the country took in Harare  CBD  playing soccer in the streets. (29 July 2016)

I read that the Zimbabwean consortium of 13 capable companies which had come together to work on the tender sometime in 2013 were betrayed by some government officials who demanded bribes before the project even took off. It seems we just don’t want to see a fellow Zimbabwean getting better in life and I bet now our administration is satisfactorily happy that the project is not in the hands of fellow black Zimbabwean professionals.

Of what use is our education if it cannot build the country and save government millions of US dollars used to import, accommodate, entertain, feed and pay other countries’ nationals for a job we can equally do? It’s no use at all because it is every graduate’s dream to leave behind a legacy of offering national service in return for a better profile other than just a degree certificate hung at home. The best thing you can ever do for your people as a failing government is to at-least invest in your own people. By contracting foreigners, whose profile are we building here? We all know that government is broke, at-least that’s what they want us to believe and we have witnessed it in the way they pay our civil service staff. But even if you can’t pay your people much, give them a profile and increase their opportunities to get better jobs in future.

With the state of job-scarcity today in Zimbabwe, I swear it is far much cheaper to employ locals to do the actual job than it is to hire foreign expertise because all we want is to evacuate the bridges in our suburbs and come back home in the evening with bread for our siblings to take to school the next morning, I’m sure they are tired of ‘Maputi’ and jolly-jus in their lunch tins.

It is so funny and hypocritical how this government preaches ‘indigenisation’ and go on to do the exact opposite. You should see them when they talk about this concept and emphasise it, OMG! It’s the best gospel in town, so sweet to your ears yet so bitter in taste. We are on a mission to indigenize but there is no faith in our own indigenous people and skills, so what are we exactly indeginising if we cannot invest in our human capital?

I can go on and on because of the injustice that has been done to our graduates, our learning institutions and a whole lot other things but today I just wish to get an answer for my question, of what use are our degrees? Who will employ our graduates if our own government which expects our votes in 2018 does not have faith in our capabilities. We are not that stupid, if the jobs are ours, give them to us, if you don’t trust us, give us a chance to prove that we are ready to build our nation. I write about this because I’m a student too and if I keep quiet, when my opportunity opens, you might pass it on to people of other countries while I wallow in poverty, joblessness and misery.

Sineke Sibanda is student in one of the local universities and writes on behalf of the concerned graduates. He can be contacted on sinekes@gmail.com

Image Credit: Newsday

Father’s Day Is Not for Single Mothers

By Cherese Jackson (Virginia)

Contrary to the cultural campaign identifying single mothers as candidates for Father’s Day, this day is designed to honor the men who acknowledge their children and hold their roles as dads in high esteem. According to the dictionary a father is a male who has child, a male parent or father-in-law, an adopted father or step-father. Any person that does not fall under those guidelines Father’s Day is not for them.

Although there are many painful and legitimate reasons women find themselves raising their children alone, that does not qualify them to be considered fathers. Often women are thrust into the role of a single parent due to circumstances outside of their control; things like abusive relationships where the woman had to leave her abuser, her partner dies or she was raped and decided against an abortion. There are also times when a woman finds herself rearing her children alone as a result of her own decisions and the consequences thereof .

With divorce rates being at an all time high sometimes the father splits and abandons his responsibilities where the children are concerned; his responsibilities are not just financial. Far too often when couples separate the mother forces the father to stay away and even uses “child support” against him. Whatever the reason a mother finds herself a single mom, being celebrated on Father’s Day is ludicrous and makes as little sense as a single father being recognized on Mother’s Day.

Do not misunderstand the point being made, the mothers who have the difficult task of managing the lives of their children alone should be honored and respected but according to the definition a woman simply cannot be a father. A child needs both parents but the roles these parents occupy are unique and equally invaluable. Even within the current culture that appreciates and encourages same-sex parents there will either be two dads or two moms.

The concept of Father’s Day was inspired by a single dad who embraced the challenge of raising his six children alone after his wife died. By including mothers who are single on a day designed for fathers helps the male role in the child’s life become further devalued. Men who are involved in the upbringing of their children should be honored, celebrated and appreciated; not undervalued.Mother’s Day is always in May and, for those that do not know, Single Parents’ Day is in March.

To spread the “love” to single moms on Father’s Day is not as empowering as it might seem. Contrariwise it capitalizes on a self-inflicted wound and stunts the process of healing. The truth is parents should be honored and appreciated every day in their respective roles.

This is not a personal issue it is a community crisis that leads a woman to believe she can do the job of a man. No matter how courageous a woman is, just as many men who are left to raise their children alone are not mothers; the role of the father is not one that can be filled by a woman. This does not take any credit away from the “Wonder Woman” that she is and the hard work she invests in taking care of her family. These things just make her an amazingly strong woman but biologically not a father.

By all means as a society we should continue to find ways to strengthen, empower and honor single women who continue to hold it down for their families. They deserve honor for their extreme commitment and dedication – just not as an equal to a male on Father’s Day, this day is for men.

There are many who will disagree with this thought process primarily because their emotions are tied to their reasoning. The definitions are clear; a male parent is a father and a female parent is a mother. When a mother is the sole party responsible for her children she is being a parent; a great one but not a father.

There is a cultural campaign which seeks to honor motherhood on Father’s Day. This day is designed to celebrate the men who embrace their roles as dads. Although a well-intentioned gesture, telling single moms that they are fathers too does not help the crisis many women are now left in or does it encourage men to step in and step up. As much as it pains some hardworking mothers to accept, Father’s Day is not for single mothers. In conclusion, from the newest father to the most seasoned grandfather “Happy Father’s Day!”

Check out our June Issue of Campus Voices and see why students say Dads are their SUPER HEROES..REAL dads not moms. LOL

 https://issuu.com/campusmoments/docs/campusmoments_j_2k16/c/sm0xdrd

Source:http://guardianlv.com