Category Archives: LIFESTYLE

The essence of culture and heritage: identity

“There is need to share with young citizens and educate them about heritage and culture as symbols of national identity and common wealth for all ethnic groups …”

by Tsungai Mhungu

People seem to forget who they are, the basis of their identity and where they come from. Change is bound to take place but continuity of culture is essential, it is heritage.

You will see that as a particular culture becomes unique, it becomes important and a marker of identity of that one group while other cultures are swept away by change owing to exchange of ideas and new preferences in terms of lifestyles in a global village.

However, no matter how prevalent change is, the word culture or heritage can never be swept away. What only lacks is the practical part, hence heritage awareness and education becomes critical

Promoting heritage awareness is equally important as safeguarding our identity. Raising Heritage and Cultural awareness has become vital especially in a fast globalizing world that we now live in and which threaten the survival of these two aspects of our social fabric as a country and as Africa as a whole.

We all know what it means when we talk about a global village, where some cultures are becoming less important and fading away as people are adopting foreign cultures and disregarding their heritage.

This could be because of uneven distribution of heritage awareness and other heritage programs across Zimbabwe owing to criteria, variability in resource availability and accessibility to different areas of the country.

This, however, is a challenge that can be curbed with dedicated effort and resources including professionally trained heritage personnel.

It is common and generally known and, may be, accepted that remote areas are less prioritized and far much disadvantaged in terms of accessibility of critical Heritage and cultural information.

It should be of concern that the urban counterparts of the remote areas have an upper hand than the later because of easy access to and availability of information, technology and heritage centers which allows them to learn more about heritage than their remote colleagues.

Usually culture and heritage are looked at from a touristic point of view (their value to outsiders) and not from conservative point of view where priority is given to posterity (so that future generations also enjoy the heritage) than their economic merits or striking a balance between the two.

This is a language only known to professionals but should be shared to all stakeholders of our cultures and heritage so that it becomes vivid to them the value of what we are trying to protect.

The provisions of the 1972 and 2003 UNESCO conventions are tools that need to be embraced and put into practice because of their recognition of the significance of heritage and the dangers that are posed by both natural and cultural events.

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The Inaugural African World Heritage Youth Forum in Roben Island, Cape Town-2016 is an example of efforts to support the effective conservation and protection of natural and cultural heritage of outstanding universal value in Africa.

I understand that Zimbabwe is a member state of the UNESCO and ratified the conventions that seek to protect culture and heritage.

This therefore suggests that heritage awareness and education is remedial to our concerns as heritage professionals.

As a country we should also learn from activities like the Bosnian heritage awareness program with the Foundation Cultural Heritage without Borders (CHWB) to show the importance of heritage for a better future.

Our concern as Heritage Professionals is further exacerbated by the recently introduced curriculum which includes Heritage studies.

With the same appreciation and respect for this initiative by the ministry of education to promote heritage and culture in Zimbabwean schools, especially faced with the fast globalizing world where heritage and cultural principles are fast being washed away and disappearing, there is, however, the need for the professionally trained heritage teachers to undertake this initiative.

The status quo in this field is inopportune taking into cognizance that heritage studies teaching stuff is borrowed from other disciplines such as History.

This under mines the very same goal that the ministry is trying to archive and also undermines heritage facts that are being compromised by the opinionated dissemination of data to students.

Our goal is to promote culture and heritage.

Culture and heritage are most important in defining a country’s identity.

It is therefore critical at this stage to engage professional heritage and cultural practitioners to equip teachers with authentic and professional information so that students are prepared not only to sit for culture and heritage studies exams with confidence but also to raise conscientiousness in students and youths in general towards culture and heritage.

There is need to share with young citizens and educate them about heritage and culture as symbols of national identity, common wealth for all ethnic groups and liberation heritage.

Such endorses national unity, Heritage laws of Zimbabwe, global laws and conventions as well as the national heritage and cultural custodian, the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe (NMMZ) and other organizations that play pivotal roles in culture and Heritage.

The bottom line is that preserving our national heritage safe guards our identity as a country.

Featured Image: Amagugu International Heritage Centre.

 

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T Gonz for Inter Varsity Shake off Winter Party

Press release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Harare, 24 July 2017 – Award winning T. Gonz is set to perform at the inaugural Inter Varsity Shake Off Winter Party taking place at Big Apple in Harare CBD on July 28, 2017.

The Hipu Hopu yekughetto proponent, T. Gonz, known for his hard hitting ghetto inspired lyrics will share the stage with Rich Nusty Swagga, university and college based Djs and musicians.

Always to be held on the last coldest month of the year, just before Spring, the event has been aptly dubbed Inter Varsity Shake Off Winter Party. It is also happening at a time when students in local universities, colleges and poly have either just finished their end of semester exams or enjoying vacation.

Crispen Rateiwa, event organiser and founding chairperson of College Youth Art Club (CYAC), said preparations for the first ever annual Inter Varsity Shake Off Winter Party were going on well.

“CYAC has decided to establish an annual blockbuster Inter Varsity Shake Off Winter Party for every year in July. Our events are more than just entertainment. The main aim is to have all tertiary students doing different degree or diploma programmes in Zimbabwe tertiary institutions network and connect while enjoying great music in a purely entertainment venue,” said Mr. Rateiwa.

College Youth Art Club has been holding oversubscribed Inter Varsity events mainly because it subsidises entry charges to all tertiary level students.

Turning to critics who associate partying with immorality, Crispen Rateiwa aslo known as R. Crisp pointed out that the shows are for mature people, voluntary and mainly meant for networking with current and former tertiary level students. All those with student IDs will get into the party after paying only a $1. Non-students pay $2.

“Besides dancing the night away, these events spur business engagement and project collaborations among students and general members of society as people discuss business ideas over drinks in a chilled and relaxed manner.  When students from different majors link up and create entrepreneurial friendships it is beneficial to them and the nation,” said Mr. Rateiwa.

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Formed in 2015 at NUST, College Youth Art Club has spread wings to all tertiary institutions in Zimbabwe. It houses literary, performing and visual artistes as well as organising performing opportunities for student artistes so that they supplement living allowances they receive from parents/guardians.

Some of the popular activities that CYAC runs are Going To The Movies, Miss Inter Varsity and many tertiary level themed events.  It also publishes a weekly entertainment guide on its facebook page, http://www.facebook.co/College-Youth -Art-Club-CYAC-TV. Moreover, it is open to partnership with any club or society or company in event planning, coordination, promotion, marketing, management and product or service awareness programs.

Contact: Crispen Rateiwa, Whatsapp number:0782 233 111, email: crisrateiwa@gmail.com

9 Money-Saving Freezer Hacks

These unlikely foods can live for months in the freezer. Never let your food spoil again!

Noelle Royer |University of Maryland

Stale chips, rotten herbs and sour milk are some of the most common catastrophes college students face. All of your staple ingredients cost less in bulk, but it’s almost impossible to use them all before they go bad. Because of this, one of the greatest struggles students face in the kitchen is food waste.

The answer to most of these problems lies in the freezer. A freezer exists to preserve highly perishable items — meat, bread, popsicles — but there are many unknown foods that are freezer friendly.

1. Eggs

Photo by Rachel Davis

Can’t use eggs fast enough? Crack them into an ice tray and freeze them. Once they’re solid, dump the egg cubes into a freezer bag. Defrost them as needed and use them as you normally would.

2. Cheese

Photo by Rachel Davis

Never let mold build colonies on your cheese again. Block cheese can be shredded and saved in bags for months.

3. Rice

Photo by Rachel Davis

Some days are just too short to waste time cooking rice. Instead, make a bunch ahead of time and portion it into freezer bags. To defrost, simply run hot water over the bag until the contents are warm. This can cut the time for meal prep in half. For a complete on-the-go frozen meal, make and freeze these rice balls.

4. Milk

Photo by Rachel Davis

Yes, you can save your milk for months without it curdling. Simply freeze the milk in its own container. Just make sure to pour out about a cup beforehand so it has room to expand. Let it defrost in the fridge a few hours before you’re ready to use it.

5. Chips/Pretzels/Crackers

Photo by Rachel Davis

Cold chips? This might sound wacky, but frozen chips actually have more crunch and flavor than regular chips. Freezing these crunchy snacks keeps them from getting soft and stale.

6. Butter

Photo by Rachel Davis

Frozen butter is actually ideal when making pastries. The colder the butter, the better it will be in creating a flakier biscuit or even a more buttery croissant.

7. Bread and Sandwiches

Photo by Rachel Davis

Your bread stays fresh in the freezer for months. The entire bag can defrost on the counter for a few hours, or you can pop a couple pieces in the toaster. You can also freeze whole sandwiches. As long as it doesn’t contain mayo, tomato or lettuce, your pre-made sandwich will defrost no-problem in your lunch bag while you’re in class.

8. Yogurt

Photo by Rachel Davis

Turn your breakfast into a frozen treat! Making your own frozen yogurt is incredibly easy. Yes, really, all you need to do is put it in the freezer.

9. Fresh Herbs

Photo by Rachel Davis

Fresh green herbs can take almost any meal up a level, but they don’t last long in the fridge. Freeze any fresh herb in an ice tray with olive oil, broth or water and pop it into a pan with your meal whenever you need it.

Did You Know That All Spoon Content Is Produced By University Students?
Article curated from Spoon University. 

Miss Nust 2017 (Official Video)

Just a little reminiscence for you this winter. Watch in 15 minutes and see how lit Miss NUST 2017 was. It was awesome. Like, subscribe and share the video. Courtesy of CM Mag and Rasheed Tv Network.

Would you move back to Zimbabwe?

So we will call this the BIG SATURDAY READ! A blog on a very good question that we would like to hear more Zimbos studying abroad  answer!!!

Ambitious African

A significant proportion of the Zimbabwean population has emigrated to other parts of the world over the years. The reasons are multiple, one of the main ones being economic. The situation in Zimbabwe has proven difficult for people to get a job and earn a decent wage to cater to their personal and family needs.

Since I returned to Zim in 2014, a question I have received quite a bit was, “why did you come home?” The short answer is that I wanted to give Zimbabwe a chance, I wanted to see what I could do to contribute to the growth and development of my country. At the time I moved back I was 24 years old, had the luxury of living at home with no dependents to take care of so it was move I was able to take.

Fast forward two and a bit years later and I…

View original post 366 more words

Why HIV is bad for our African economies: Message to collegiates and African young people.

Sineke Sibanda

A few weeks ago, a local newspaper here in Zimbabwe published a story that despite an overal fair decline in cases of HIV in our country, about 3 provinces had inadvertently recorded a rise of upto approximately 3% in new infections, labeling them high speed hotspots. Of course I did not take heed to it at first as I thought it didn’t really concern me. But wait! I thought to myself. With issues like HIV that have no cure as yet, we might be in trouble if this trend keeps going on.

After a chat with a colleague, I was thinking through the bigger picture. For instance, what does it mean to have an active age-group being infected by HIV/AIDS? I thought through it in terms of how it affects our economy, and it was sad that we might be on a regressive course.

According to the World Health Organisation, Africa is still battling to contain the virus and subsequently its affecting economic development in most of our countries. Roberts, Dixon and McDonald (2002) in their health economics theory article (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1122139/) argue that HIV/AIDS reduces labour supply, and productivity, it also reduces exports while increasing imports.

True, this sort of situation is bound to happen in a situation where the workforce is weak and is largely on medication. It means we need more hospitals than we need to build new companies because at the end of it all, our people are more important than anything else. Because the people that are supposed to be manufacturing the drugs are off sick, it means we have to lose money through imports, low productivity and forget about the exports we could be making.

When I looked at it this way, that is when I thought its probably something we need to think about as young people of Africa with the hope of seeing Agenda 2063 come to fruition.

A case in point is Zimbabwe, where an annual budget is $4 billion, and of that amount, 8.3% (US$330.79 million)  (UNICEF, 2016) [https://www.unicef.org/zimbabwe/Zimbabwe_2016_Health_and_Child_Care_Budget_Brief.pdf] was dedicated to the health ministry. Sad to note that the ministry itself was worried that the allocation was very inadequate, this means only one thing, that we have more sick people and need to cultivate a culture of healthy living and avoid what we can.

What is more heartbreaking in the case in point is that the Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development was allocated 7.6% and these are the institutions that should device methods of making our countries better. Probably, if we had fewer sick people, we would have half of the health ministry allocation going toour science and technology development ministry. The UNICEF made this conclusion on the budget:
The 2016 health care allocation is 1.6% lower than the total budget allocated in 2013, mainly reflecting a weakening fiscal environment constraining government spending in general, and health & child care in particular, (UNICEF, 2016: 3)

This case is not only unique to Zimbabwe, I’m sure some countries share in this calamity too but it all calls us to do one thing, take possible action to save the future if we cannot save ourselves.

Depite some of these epidemics being those we can control, they have continued to keep us pre-occupied and subsequently stalling development. According to the Amfar (http://www.amfar.org/worldwide-aids-stats/) statistics, in 2015, there were 19 million people in East and Southern Africa—more than half of whom were women—living with HIV in eastern and southern Africa, and an estimated 960,000 people became newly infected.

In 2015, 470,000 people died of AIDS-related causes. Eastern and southern Africa accounts for 46% of the global total of new HIV infections. The statistics are not quite pleasing to be honest, so on a yearly basis, the world loses about 15 million people to HIV related deaths.

I don’t at all intend to paint a gloomy picture, but for something we can control as African college students and young people, we can surely do better to make our home a beter place. I’m also in search of ideas on how best we can work on this together. As we speak, according to the Economic theory predictions, the pandemic has already reduced average national economic growth rates by 2-4% a year across Africa. Imagine how else we could have used these ‘losses’…

Just In Case You Missed it: December 2016 Issue Preveiw

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On the Cover : uBabes we Swagg ,Aremokeng Swene.

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Contents :

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Lifestyle news:

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Focus

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Inspiration:Engineer par excellence, visionary, leader: Donald Mjonono.

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Campus Voices

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Read the whole digital magazine below:

Zimbabwe's Leading Lifestyle CampusZine

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