Category Archives: CURRENT AFFAIRS

Zimbabwe election: Troops fire on MDC Alliance supporters

Three people were killed in Zimbabwe’s capital Harare after troops opened fire on rioting opposition supporters, police say.

The government says the army was deployed in central Harare to help police restore order.

The opposition MDC Alliance condemned the crackdown, saying it was a reminder of the “dark days” of Robert Mugabe’s rule.

It alleges that the governing Zanu-PF party has rigged Monday’s elections.

Parliamentary results show Zanu-PF heading for a big majority in the first elections since long-serving ruler Mr Mugabe was ousted from power.

The presidential result has yet to be declared. However, the MDC Alliance insists that its presidential candidate, Nelson Chamisa, won Monday’s election.

European Union monitors have expressed concern over the length of time it is taking to declare the presidential result.

What are the two sides saying?

President Emmerson Mnangagwa was quoted by state broadcaster ZBC as saying: “We hold the opposition MDC Alliance and its whole leadership responsible for this disturbance of national peace, which was meant to disrupt the electoral process.”

He later took to Twitter to urge peace:

Justice Minister Ziyambi Ziyambi said the army had been deployed in Harare to disperse a violent crowd and to restore “peace and tranquillity”.

He added: “The presence of the army is not to intimidate people but to ensure that law and order is maintained. They are there to assist the police.”

A spokesman for Mr Chamisa condemned the deployment of soldiers and the subsequent loss of life.

“Soldiers are trained to kill during war. Are civilians enemies of the state?” he asked.

“There is no explanation whatsoever for the brutality that we saw today.”

Correspondents say the violence was confined to the centre of Harare – an opposition stronghold – while other parts of the country remain calm. Latest reports from the capital suggest the security forces are in control of the streets.

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‘Chaotic scene of burning tyres’

By Pumza Fihlani, BBC News, Harare

Army vehicles and police trucks rolled into Zimbabwe’s main city on Wednesday after the wait for the election results took an ugly turn.

MDC Alliance supporters had been gathering in various parts of Harare since the morning, but when news came that Zanu-PF had won the majority of seats in parliament and that the presidential results were not ready, the previously upbeat mood changed.

Opposition supporters went on the rampage down Harare’s busy streets, heading towards an old Zanu-PF office and carrying large stones, sticks and anything else they could grab along the way. The crowd chanted: “We want Chamisa.”

They believe the election has been stolen, and are demanding the MDC be announced as the winner.

Riot police using water cannon and tear gas arrived to a chaotic scene of burning tyres and an unrelenting crowd. There were hundreds of them. They jeered and pelted the police vans with stones.

In another part of the city where more opposition protesters had gathered, the army used whips to disperse them.

Today’s clashes may not have been on the scale of the “days of old”, where intimidation by security police was the order of the day, but it’s certainly not the peace many had been praising until now. Something has changed here.

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What results have been declared?

The Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (Zec) has announced 140 seats for Zanu-PF so far, and 58 for the MDC Alliance, ZBC state media reported. There are 210 seats in the National Assembly’s lower house.

More than five million people were registered to vote, and there was a high turnout of 70%.

Map of election results. MDC won in the cities but Zanu PF dominated the rural areas

ZBC had reported that the electoral commission would announce the presidential results at 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT) on Wednesday, but only parliamentary results were read out.

The BBC’s Shingai Nyoka reports that the announcement on the presidential poll was not made because representatives of some of the 23 candidates had failed to turn up to verify the results.

A presidential candidate needs more than 50% of the vote to win outright. Otherwise, a run-off election will be held on 8 September.

What are election observers saying?

The EU mission has criticised the delay in announcing the presidential results. Zec has until Saturday to do so.

People queuing to vote
Image captionThe electoral commission says 70% of registered voters took part in the election

It said it had observed several problems, including media bias, voter intimidation and mistrust in the electoral commission, adding that there was an “improved political climate, but un-level playing field and lack of trust”.

This is the first time in 16 years that the government has allowed EU and US election monitors into the country.

The African Union mission has said the elections “took place in a very peaceful environment” and “were highly competitive”.

It added that it could not confirm opposition parties’ complaints of vote-buying, intimidation by the state and bias by traditional leaders.

A preliminary report by the Southern African Development Community (Sadc) observers said the elections were largely peaceful and conducted in accordance with the law.

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More on post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

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Meet the frontrunners:

Emmerson Mnangagwa, Zanu-PF

Emmerson Mnangagwa at a rally in Harare, ZimbabweImage copyrightAFP
  • Known as “the crocodile” because of his political shrewdness – his party faction is known as “Lacoste”
  • Accused of masterminding attacks on opposition supporters after the 2008 election
  • Thought to be 75 years old, he promises to deliver jobs and is seen as open to economic reforms
  • Survived several alleged assassination attempts, blamed on supporters of ex-President Mugabe.

Read more: The ‘crocodile’ who snapped back

Nelson Chamisa, MDC Alliance

Nelson Chamisa at a rally in Harare, ZimbabweImage copyrightREUTERS
  • His skull was fractured when beaten up by state security agents in 2007
  • Became an MP at 25, a cabinet minister at 31 and could become the youngest president at 40
  • A recently qualified pastor, he has been using the hashtag #GodIsInIt for his campaign
  • Has promised to rebuild the country’s devastated economy, but has been criticised for making extravagant promises – such as the introduction of a high-speed bullet train and bringing the Olympics to Zimbabwe
Source BBC News
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The Keyword Approach To A CV & Cover Letter

Staff Writer | @campusmoments13
4 minute read

In a keyword search of resumes and cover letters, employers identify, either electronically or manually, important words or phrases related to the job description. Candidates will then be selected for further review based on the number and/or level of matches found in the search.

According to Registered Organisational Psychologist & Career Coach, Phiona Martin, “Most companies are using (Applicant Tracking Systems)ATS and if you are making online applications, you can no longer ignore the requirement for your CV to be ATS “friendly.”

To develop a keyword resume and cover letter, study the job description carefully, identifying important words/phrases from both the responsibilities and qualifications of the job (highlighted in red for demonstration purposes only). Incorporate these words and phrases into your resume and cover letter using your background and experiences.

Sample Cover Letter

career chat cover lettr.png
Incorporate words and phrases directly from the job description that pertain to your skills and experience (shown in red for demonstration purposes only. Do not use red in your resume or letter)

Phiona Martin recommends the following seven ways to ensure your CV is ATS attractive and actually lands in a human recruiters hands.

  1. Mirror the Job Description wording in your CV, including the tense it is written e.g if job description says “management of suppliers” change if your CV says “managing vendors and contractors”. This requires customising your CV for every job. NB:  Do NOT copy and paste job description word-for-word you may be penalised by ATS or recruiter.
  2. Nail those keywords. There is lingo in every profession/industry. It maybe software, skills, certifications, licenses, responsibilities, or  procedures. The words that matter in your profession need to be included in your CV/Resume. Use both acronyms and spelled out form of titles.
  3. Repeat important keywords related to your skills a few times in your CV. Do NOT merely stuff as many key words as possible as the new scanners pick up this tactic. It will also be a turn-off to the recruiter who actually reads the CV if your CV does get past the scanner process.  A recommended suggestion is using a keyword two to three times per CV, taking into account that it is coherently placed.
  4. Make use of free cloud services like Wordle and TagCrowd to help you determine the right keywords to use in your CV. Just copy and paste the job description into the generators and the software will tell you which keywords are important to include in your CV.
  5. Only use text. Don’t use graphics, logos, or tables in your CV as fancy graphics, images, tables, and logos confuse the ATS. Anything placed in header and footer areas is invisible to the ATS, do not put important information in these sections.
  6. Headings. Put in straight forward traditional headings such as; Work Experience, Education, Qualifications, Experience, Hobbies, and References and avoid creative titles as they may not be recognised by the ATS
  7. Job Titles. Pay attention to the job title in the advert. E.g. if you are a Finance Manager, but the job title is for an Accounting Manager, be sure that you include “Accounting Manager” somewhere in your CV.

Sample CV

career chat 2.png
Incorporate words and phrases directly from the job description that pertain to your skills and experience (shown in red for demonstration purposes only. Do not use red in your resume or letter)
Get more from the #CareerCoach at http://www.phionamartin.com/blog. Sample CV & Cover Letter adapted from unl.edu/careers

 

What’s stopping Zimbabwe’s young people from participating in elections?

Doctoral Candidate, Durban University of Technology
4 minute read

Zimbabwe will hold fresh elections at the end of this month, a sign that, following decades of rule under autocratic leader Robert Mugabe, the southern African nation is on the path towards democracy.

But are the country’s young people ready to get involved in politics?

The signs elsewhere on the continent aren’t hopeful. Given Africa’s youth bulge, in which 39.5% of the continent’s population is aged between 18 and 45, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to expect the majority of voters would be young people. But this is not the case.

For the most part, young people are apathetic when it comes to elections. While they’re the most affected by democratic processes, they appear to be the least interested in them. For example in Nigeria’s 2011 polls, only 52.6% of young people voted while in South Africa’s 2014 national elections, apathy was the reason for a registration level of just 33% for 18 and 19 year olds.

This phenomenon isn’t unique to Africa. Across the world young voters are failing to turn up at the polls. Levels of youth participation are verylow in the UK and Ireland and most of the southern European states like Italy, Greece and Portugal.

In my recent study, I set out to explore the level of youth participation (as candidates, voters and activists) in Zimbabwe’s elections and governance processes, what restricts their participation and what can be done to support them. I defined youth as people aged between 15 and 35.

My evidence showed that their participation is low, hampered by restrictive political parties and a lack of three things – interest, information and funds.

To change this, there needs to be an effort to create political, structural and physical spaces that allow for their meaningful participation. This could, for example, include allocating quotas to young people and prioritising youth empowerment. South Africa’s two main opposition parties have done this well – young people lead the Democratic Allianceas well as the Economic Freedom Fighters.

Research findings

A third of the young people I interviewed said that they hadn’t taken part in activities such as rallies, council meetings and meetings within communities. A quarter of them said they didn’t participate often while only a fifth said they did so extremely often.

Political parties were cited as the main reason (67%) that prevented meaningful youth participation. For example, only 17% believed that political parties were creating spaces and making an effort to level the playing field so that they could participate in elections.

This exclusion is driven by what the scholar and expert on young people, Barry Checkoway, calls ‘adultism’ – when adults take a position that they are better than young people and prescribe solutions for them. Young people are seen as potentially dangerous elements that should be kept away from key decision-making processes.

On top of this, poverty makes young people particularly vulnerable to being excluded. About 70% of young people in Zimbabwe are unemployed. And those that work experience extreme poverty, earningless than US$2 per capita per day. This renders them susceptible to exploitation and control – young people who are poor are ready to sell their rights, for food hand-outs and promises of jobs that never materialise.

But it’s not just about the adults. Young people are also to blame for low participation.

In the interviews they showed a lack of interest in a system they felt they couldn’t change. They share this apathy with many other Zimbabweans. The legitimacy of the country’s elections since independence has always been a thorny issue. The opposition has regularly raised accusations of vote-buying, electoral fraud, vote rigging, as well as the intimidation of voters by the ruling party – Zanu-PF. This has led many to question the legitimacy of the electoral process.

Other barriers to young people include a lack of financial resources, lack of capacity, lack of information and the absence of a culture of positive engagement. Most believed that young people were prepared to run for office in the 2018 elections. But nearly half indicated that young people needed more support, such as leadership training, in preparation for running for office.

Increasing participation

When asked what the top five solutions to improving the participation of young people were the answers included:

  • freedom to participate in politics and development without restrictions (71%),
  • provision of leadership training (54%),
  • youth awareness campaigns (42%),
  • pro-youth policies (40%), and
  • effective engagement in productive activities (38%).

Young people should be viewed as a vital source  of information which justifies the need for adults to give them space and opportunities to engage meaningfully. This could be done through local campaigns, like the United Nations’ ‘Not Too Young to Run’ campaign. This promotes the right for young people to run for office, creates awareness and mobilises them.

Young people also need to be equipped to participate in politics. This includes getting support through leadership training and training in elections and governance processes. Finally, resources and support must be given to youth-led initiatives that are reaching out to young people.

Featured Image: https://www.theguardian.com/international. Article curated from http://theconversation.com

 

NUST Student Satisfaction Survey

The following survey is conducted by Division of Students Affairs at NUST to evaluate student satisfaction with services provided by the institution. The purpose being to identify areas for improvement. Completing this survey implies your informed consent.

By completing this survey, you stand a chance to win a tablet, external hard-drives and lunch vouchers

 

GZU students protest over poor conditions

By Felix Machiwenyika/ Hazvinei Mwanaka/Sukuoluhle Ndlovu | Newsday
One minute read

RIOT police on Thursday fired teargas canisters to disperse students at Great Zimbabwe University (GZU), who stormed the institution’s Mashava campus protesting against poor diet, unsafe drinking water, hiked tuition fees and withdrawal of wi-fi facilities.

GZU acting vice-chancellor, Andrew Chindanya, confirmed the students’ protests and said they were engaging the union leaders to resolve their grievances.

“I am in the process of talking to them now, we are trying to resolve the situation,” he said.

A student who requested anonymity accused riot police of brutality in crushing the protests which he claimed had been cleared by police in Masvingo.

“We were given the permission to engage in a peaceful demo, but to our surprise the police and campus security guards stormed us with tear smoke and fired guns at us,” he said.

“The standards of living for students have drastically deteriorated, there is shortage of water and sometimes it’s dirty,” another student said.

The demonstrations started in the morning, with groups of students blocking roads to the campus.

“The tuition fee was hiked without consulting us, where do they think we will get that money from? We all know our economic situation. We pay our fees and yet still the campus facilities and management is so poor,” one student who was at the scene said.

“The police arrived at the scene and threw teargas canisters at the students in a bid to force us abandon the demonstration, but we shall continue until the situation is resolved. At least they should provide us with tangible solutions. We want to be treated equally with other students from other campuses, why do they segregate us yet we are from the same university and paying same fees,” said another female student who declined to be named.

5 Lessons from #VisaBae’s predicament

by Staff Writer

2 minute read

1. Be cautious of information you cannot fact check

Not everything you see on social media is legit and   is just another reminder that things on social media are not always what they seem to be(Think fake news also). Rutendo Tichiwangani (@RLT_) said that she did not own any of the clothes and designer bags she wore for the gram yet most potential suitors thought she was out of their league and her followers aspired to have her “fake” lifestyle. Be wise and cautious of anything you cannot fact check on social and mainstream media.

2. Get your priorities right

As Scott Caan said, “Good things happen when you get your priorities straight.”
#Visabae did not have to wait until a month was left to sort the Visa issue out. Surely, it is tempting to judge that she did not make it a priority. She knew for a reasonable amount of time as an adult that she had to fix her status in the UK and still did nothing about it. If she had heard Scott Caan’s wisdom in good time, she’d have saved herself all this drama.

3. Be driven by a cause not applause

When one has a cause, the motivation comes from within. You will not need to look outside yourself for approval or affirmation and you stop becoming a slave to the opinions of others. Just like in #Visabae’s case, not everyone was supportive. But she did not back down on her plea for help despite all the criticism and backlash.

4. You can’t rely on freelancing as a sustainable source of income

Despite the fact that the Gig Economy is growing, especially in the direction of online marketing and influencing (see Oxford Internet Institute’s Online Labour Index), it is best as a side hustle especially if you are freelancing. Even though #VisaBae has 70k followers on Instagram, she struggled to save up just over 2000 pounds. The problem could have been no income stability.

5. In life just be humble and be yourself nothing beats authenticity

#Visabae decided to be honest and transparent with her situation and ended up with an extra 2000 pounds for her Visa. We usually assume that others won’t understand and accept the truth, but if we gather up courage and step forward with the truth — it will be appreciated

 

40% off fees for students on industrial attachment

by Talent Gumpo

TERTIARY students on industrial attachment heaved a sigh of relief yesterday when the government slashed their attachment fees by 40% to promote inclusive and quality education in line with Sustainable Development Goals’ Vision 2030.

In a statement, Higher and Tertiary Education permanent secretary Desire Mutize Sibanda said the students would now be required to pay 60% of tuition fees with immediate effect.

“The ministry of Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology is pleased to advise all parents, guardians, sponsors that all higher and tertiary education students on industrial attachment/teaching practice will now be required to pay 60% of tuition fees with immediate effect,” he said.

“…the decision was influenced by the economic environment and the socio-economic status of the majority of the students.”

Sibanda said the decision was influenced by the economic environment and the socio-economic status of the majority of the students.

“Students on attachment meet the costs of accommodation, food, and transport to and from work. The ministry considered the variable and fixed costs attendant to students’ supervision and utilisation of teaching and learning facilities,” he said.

“In reducing the cost to 60% of tuition, the ministry considered that institutions require funds to meet supervisory costs for each student on attachment albeit the majority of students continue to access library and other learning facilities and social developments of the country.”

Last year, the Zimbabwe National Students’ Union (Zinasu) petitioned then Higher Education minister Jonathan Moyo demanding the scrapping of attachment fees for all students on industrial attachment.

Zinasu secretary-general, Ashley Pfunye said the government should have scrapped 60% of the fees.

#CurrentSituation: Students ‘Shutdown’ Nust in protest over strike

Developing Story | 2 minute read

Students barricaded the National University of Science and Technology on Monday morning in protest against the institution’s inability to resolve issues with lecturers who have been on strike for three weeks .

According to the Nust Student Representative Council (SRC), the protest dubbed #NustShutDown, was staged to compel the institution to resolve the deadlock with lecturers,  a situation that has resulted in the disruption of learning.

“Students have not been learning for about four weeks now and we have come to a situation where we have to do just about anything to get the attention of stakeholders at Nust,” said SRC President Pablo Chimusoro.

By  8 a.m, all entrance and exit points had been blocked and nobody was allowed on campus.

Administration staff were stranded at City Hall as their daily bus could not exit to shuttle them to work. Others were stranded in their vehicles along the Cecil Avenue entrance.

The shutdown is happening days after government announced the appointment of Prof Mqhele Dlodlo as substantive Vice Chancellor of the university.

Here is a timeline of key developments

  • 26 Feb 2018: Students shutdown Nust 

Students barricade university – all entrance/exit points blocked -as they mount pressure on institution to solve lecturers’ strike

  • 21 Feb 2018: Govt appoints Prof Mqhele Dlodlo as  substantive Vice Chancellor:

The lack of a proactive and substantive Vice-Chancellor was believed to be a contributing factor in the gross  mismanagement of funds by the institution’s executive, hence the appointment 

  • 16 Feb 2018: Students join strike

Students marched to the university’s administration offices protesting over the impasse.

  • 13 Feb 2018: Nust takes lecturers to the Labour Court

The university responded to the strike by contesting the legality of the industrial action.

  • 7 Feb 2018: Nust lecturers strike for the second time in the same academic year.

Nust lecturers downed tools, alleging mismanagement at the institution- splashing money on luxurious vehicles at the expense of students’ learning materials and equipment –  which they said was crippling the university’s operations. 

  • 29 Jan 2018: 2nd Semester of academic year commences.

Second semester commenced amidst high expectations given the new political dispensation in the country

Campus News Round-Up: What You Might Have Missed This Week (4 – 10 February 2018)

Editorial Staff 

5 minute read

WINKY D delivered a stellar performance with his newly released album at the Nust Semester Welcome Bash at the  ceremonial hall in Bulawayo on Saturday night.

This came a day after he launched his much anticipated album Gombwe in Harare.

Local favourites, DJ Nospa and DJ Mzoe warmed up the stage for the Gafa.  They did not disappoint.

About izolo…icho chibaba @winkyddibigman

A post shared by Hunter the steady (@nimfyah) on

As expected the Ninja president and his Vigilance Band gave a spirited performance, blending the new and the old.

He performed songs from the new album that was launched on his birthday but nothing was new in terms of living up to expectations.

The album, which is a mixture of party and dance songs, has already proven to be a hit.

Those who did not make it to the HICC got their fair share of the Gafa’s worldclass act at Nust.

Winky D who got on stage at around half one launched his performance with old songs from previous albums with the crowd singing along throughout.

As if in trance the Disappear hit-maker performed his seemingly favourite song Ngirozi, from the new album featuring choral group, Vabati VaJehova, more than three times with the crowd responding well to the new gospel dance hall tune.

Winky D kept the students on their feet with songs like Toyi Toyi, Old School, Green Like Me Garden and Godo.

He left the stage at 3.30am yesterday and the crowd kept clamouring for more.

First Copy of Gombwe Sold For US$40 000

Businessman and socialite Genius “Ginimbi” Kadungure bought the first copy of Winky D’s latest album, Gombwe, for $40 000 during its launch on Friday night at the Harare International Conference Centre (HICC).

Ginimbi who is known for flaunting his wealth on social media wanted to buy the auctioned disc at $20 000 but he was forced to revise the initial amount after flamboyant Albert Ndabambi ‘outshined’ him by bidding the CD for $30 000.

Ginimbi dug deeper into his pockets forking another $20 000 to make it $40 000 in total.

At the end of the night, Winky D smiled all the way to the bank with a cool $70 000, a lump sum.- (Chronicle)

South Sudanese Students Go Green 

Midlands State University South Sudan Students, in conjunction with the National Forest Commission, embarked on a tree planting exercise at the Graduate School of Business Leadership campus on the 30th of January 2018.

The exercise aimed at creating a vibrant and healthy environment for the students and the surrounding communities.

The project coordinator, Kan Gueh Kan Lapdhor, highlighted that the initiative was driven by the ideals of Zimbabwe’s National Tree Planting Day which is held annually in December.

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Ladphor said the initiative was meant to improve the learning, working and living environment for Midlands State University and the surrounding community as trees provide clean air.

“The role of trees on the planet is comparable to that of lungs in human beings. Therefore, it is imperative to plant trees at our University to improve the living conditions of human beings and bring balance to the ecosystem through the production of clean air,” said Kan.

The Midlands State University International Relations Office also highlighted that this initiative came as a result of the need to join the world in combating global warming which has affected most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.

International Relations Office representative, Qinisani Bhebe, weighed in on the tree planting initiative by highlighting its contribution towards the reduction of global warming.

Mr Ilunga, representing the Student Affairs Division, applauded the efforts made by the Midlands State University International students towards creating a green environment.

Ilunga went on to thank the National Forest Commission for the donation of two hundred and fifty trees.

“As the Student Affairs Division, we would like to commend the South Sudan students for coming up and implementing an initiative that would help preserve our environment.”

This tree planting initiative is also going to leave a lasting legacy of their courtesy not only towards Midlands State University but the nation at large.

This tree planting exercise shall be an ongoing process at Midlands State University as the International students scale up their fight against global warming to make this world a better place to live in.- (MSU Facebook)

Govt to review harsh media laws

“Zimbabwe was one of the first countries to introduce legislation on access to information-the AIPPA Act, but unfortunately, AIPPA is better in prohibiting access to information than in facilitating it,” 

 

Government says it is in the process of aligning media laws with the constitution as well as reviewing some laws that impede the smooth operation of the media.

The media is Zimbabwe is operating under harsh conditions which have seen various journalists being arrested for stories they would have written and also failing to access information from public institutions.

Speaking at the launch of the European Union and Norwegian government funded Media and Elections Program, Acting Minister of Information, Media and Broadcasting Services Simon Khaya-Moyo said work is already under way to align the laws.

“At policy level, the Ministry of Information is in the process of aligning the two pieces of media legislation that fall within its purview that is the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA) and the Broadcasting Services Act (BSA) with the constitution, they must be aligned with the constitution and we are working expeditiously to ensure this is accomplished.

“The ministry is also alive to the fact that there are other laws that affect the media and continues to engage with other government stakeholders to ensure that we create a more favourable working environment for the media,” he said.

Simon Khaya Moyo

Speaking at the same occasion Head of European Union Delegation to Zimbabwe, Ambassador Philippe Van Damme said if the media is to play its role of reinforcing accountability then the stringent laws must be address as matter of urgent.

“If we want the media to full play their role of informing public debate and reinforcing scrutiny and accountability of electoral and democratic processes, the issues will need to be addressed, not only through the legal framework, but also in the way the laws are effectively applied.

“Zimbabwe was one of the first countries to introduce legislation on access to information-the AIPPA Act, but unfortunately, as you all know, AIPPA is better in prohibiting access to information than in facilitating it,” he said.

Ambassador Van Damme added that the media is also constrained in its watchdog role by harsh economic conditions and general lack of professional skills and deontological standards.

He said the media is also constrained by threats from politicians or other wealthy and/or well-connected individuals under the investigations.- (Daniel Chingundu/Open Parly ZW)

Residents object to construction of Nust hostels

PROPERTY owners in Bulawayo’s Selbourne Park, Matsheumhlope and Riverside, have objected to the proposed construction of halls of residence for National University of Science and Technology (Nust) students in their area, saying this would cause overpopulation and a spike in the crime rate.

BY SHARON SIBINDI | Newsday

Local councillor, Silas Chigora said most property owners in the area were against the construction of hostels by Zimre Property Investment Limited and Infrastructure Development Bank of Zimbabwe (IDBZ ).

“The residents are against the move, saying crime will increase in the area. To make matters worse, Gwanda Road is always busy and just imagine 3 000 people crossing that road every day. At times accidents may occur,” he said.

Contacted for comment, Zimre managing director, Edson Muvingi said the hostels were not exclusively for Nust students, but would benefit students from other tertiary institutions.

“…Crime will increase in the area … Gwanda Road is always busy and just imagine 3 000 people crossing that road every day. At times accidents may occur..,” 

“We are not intending to build accommodation exclusively for Nust students. There are about eight major tertiary institutions that we are targeting. There is a serious student accommodation crisis in Bulawayo and our model provides for custom-made, study-friendly facilities,” he said.

“Currently, students are accommodated in all manner and form of accommodation at pre-emptive rentals. So many students are already renting within these specific areas. Nust and other tertiary institutions are excited about the prospects of such private investments. I may not be able to address questions relating to perceived personal gain or loss.

“We are informed that the university is also securing land for student accommodation off campus. Our investment model is long term, where we hold the structures in perpetuity and benefit from both rental and capital value appreciation or a reasonable terminal value.

“The profile of our investors also requires so, as they have long-term liability profiles. In an unstable economic environment, on campus built, operate and transfer arrangements, where the tenure for recovery of both capital and profit is fixed, can be a nightmare. We have had the benefit of our experience.”

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