Law student lands Miss Tourism Bulawayo crown

2 minute read

TWENTY-FOUR year-old law student with University of South Africa Anelisiwe Ndebele was on Saturday crowned Miss Tourism Bulawayo provincial winner after she shrugged off competition from a bevy of 22 models at Rainbow Hotel in Bulawayo.

The pageant was the last round of the search for models who will contest in the Miss Tourism Zimbabwe national finals on September 8 in Bulawayo where Ndebele will represent Bulawayo province.

For her efforts, Ndebele, a holder of a Bachelor of Arts Degree and currently works as a procurement officer at Techno Expert Construction Company pocketed $2 000 courtesy of pageant sponsors, Progress Mines and Consha Enterprise headed by businessman and politician, Farai Taruvinga.

Sibusisiwe Falala and Tendai Sibanda came first and second princess respectively, while Natasha Gora became Miss Personality with Thelma Ncube being named the most promising model.

miss-tourism-zimbabwe-bulawayo-queen-anelisiwe-ndebele-flanked-by-first-princess-sibuisiwe-falala-and-second-princess-tendai-sibanda-1
Miss Tourism Zimbabwe (MTZ) Bulawayo queen Anelisiwe Ndebele flanked by first princess Sibuisiwe Falala and second princess Tendai Sibanda (left)

Ndebele and Falala are all under the mentorship of Open Eye Studios run by former Miss Zimbabwe Samantha Tshuma.

“I am overwhelmed with this achievement, I thank everyone who has supported my journey and most importantly Fingers Academy for giving the girl child a chance to showcase a talent. Special acknowledgment goes to my mentor Samantha Tshuma of Open Eye Studios,” Ndebele said.

“Preparing for the national finals starts today, and I hope to keep the crown in the City of Queens and Kings.”

The national licence holder for Miss Tourism Zimbabwe and Fingers Academy director Sarah Mpofu Sibanda was happy with the progress they have made so far.

“It was not an easy road doing all the provincial finals. I thank our provincial licence holders who pulled great pageants and also providing the best models who will do duty on September 8 here in Bulawayo,” she said

The pageant coincided with Fingers Academy’s 30th anniversary.

“I thank everyone who has supported us as Fingers, the models we have worked with. We will continue churning out not just models, but ambassadors who will represent the city, the country and the continent,” Mpofu Sibanda said.

Guests at the pageant were left in stitches by host, Babongile Skhonjwa who treated them to a lively stand-up comedy show in-between the models’ sessions.

Source - chronicle.co.zw / nust.ac.zw
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NUST student and Alumna co-founded online farm system wins at Seedstars Competition

One minute read

NUST student and alumna co-founded technical start-up, Rera Online Farm, has emerged the winner of the Zimbabwean leg of the Seedstars World Competition. They have managed to book a spot for themselves in the regional competitions penned for this December in Ivory Coast, after shrugging off stiff competition from nine other innovators.

The Rera online system is a four-year-old brain child of a NUST final year Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering student, Rick Masuku, former Electronic Engineering student Ratanang Noko and a Harare based technical enthusiast, Gladson Dube.

If Rera wins the regional competition in Ivory Coast, the startup will qualify for the global Seedstars Summit, to be held in Switzerland next year in April where the innovators will battle it out with other technical startups from around the globe.

By participating at the Global Seedstars Summit, the online startup stands a chance to win up to US$1 million in equity investment for their project.

The Zimbabwe competition took place on Friday June 29 at Impact Hub Harare, with nine startups pitching in front of a local jury which comprised of Nhena Nyagura from Dandemutande, Ethel Bangwayo from United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Sharon Wekwete from Omidyar Network and Lilian Mbayiwa from Old Mutual.

Rera is an online platform that provides an opportunity for consumers to farm their own poultry produce through “three easy steps” which are by signing up for an account on the Rera website, creating their own fowl run by selecting the type of poultry produce and quantity they want to farm and lastly, once they confirm their poultry produce, the Rera sales agents advise the retail consumers on the payment procedure.

According to one of the founders of the online farm, the system could not have come at the right time than now when most people are digitally literate citing how they can save money by trying it out.

“Rera is an online platform that provides an opportunity for consumers to farm their own chicken in less than 5 minutes,it is a simple to use system like any other social media platform most people are familiar to,” said Masuku.

“With a low production cost of about $3.75 per chicken, this cuts costs for farmers, fast food outlets or even any interested buyer,” he added.

Source-nust.ac.zw

Internship on sexual and reproductive health and rights

VACANCY 

Internship in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) networking  in Southern Africa

The Hivos Regional Office Southern Africa is offering an opportunity to work on SRHR. The objective of the internship is to enhance the educational experience of undergraduate and graduate students from diverse academic backgrounds through practical work assignments and on-the-job experience in order to expose them to the work being done in the health and development sector.

The position is based in Johannesburg and the intern will work under the guidance of the Project Manager SRHR, who is responsible for managing a Regional Fund on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, which includes a knowledge management function and other related activities such as providing support to the upkeep and promotion of the Sex Rights Africa Network web site as well as developing and implementing projects and programs targeted to SRHR work in Southern Africa.

The work will focus on the following activities:

  • Promote the Regional SRHR Fund and Sex Rights Africa Network by identifying creative social media options to conduct outreach with relevant individuals and organizations
  • Support the convening of meetings of stakeholders working on SRHR using the web site as well as the organization of face-to-face meetings
  • Work with a colleague to identify and support ways to make the web site an active site for networking, knowledge management and convening spaces to collaborate on activities such as advocacy
  • Undertake research aimed at identifying relevant documents to upload to the web site as well as to support the development of proposals for future work on SRHR
  • Provide support to the management of the grant-making process including support to contracting, logistics, liaison and follow-up with grantees
  • Contribute to the drafting of reports and proposals linked to the regional SRHR portfolio
  • Attend meetings on SRHR to gather knowledge of relevance to the SRHR portfolio and establish networks of people and organizations working on SRHR

Eligibility

Undergraduates or postgraduates who intend to study further or to work in area of international development ideally with a focus on health/sexual and reproductive health, communications, human rights or fields connected to the objectives of the RSRHR Fund and Hivos SRHR work in Southern Africa.

Requirements & Degree Fields of Study

We are looking for a highly motivated and dynamic person with:

  • Strong research and writing skills
  • Experience and ability to use social media and work with web sites
  • Experience working on development project is preferred
  • Ability to work independently and to interact and network with potential stakeholders
  • Degree in International Development, Public Health, Law, Communications, Social Sciences or related fields
  • A reference letter from your university and/or from previous relevant work experience is required.

Duration

Six months with the potential for extension.

Please note: the Hivos Internship Programme is in no way connected with appointment to positions at the professional level within the organisation.

Application Address:

If you meet the above mentioned requirements (please look carefully), send a letter explaining your motivation to apply for this position and your CV to:

Hivos e-mail: rosaf@hivos.org

or deliver: 20 Phillips Avenue, Belgravia, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Deadline for submission of CV and letter:

The deadline for applications is 12 January 2017. Please note that only short listed applicants will be contacted.

Commencement date and duration of the Agreement:

Timeframe: The period of the service will start from January 2017 to June  2017

Work Schedule: Working & Research days are from Monday to Friday from 8:30 – 4:30 PM

Location: We are in the process of identifying new office space in Johannesburg. In the short term, the identified intern will work virtually with regular meetings and communication with the Project Manager.

#We’R’OnIt AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON CAMPUS BECAUSE IT’S ON US

Only five out of more than 20 tertiary institutions in #Zimbabwe have sexual harassment policies. #We’R’OnIt and demand that all higher learning centers enact such policies by November 2017

Let’s orange the world and help eradicate violence against women.

TOO EMBARRASSED TO SHARE, BUT BECAUSE I CARE WILL SHARE IT INSTEAD!!

Don’t people have a decency to at least pretend like they adhere to certain commemorations which speak directly to the woman? It’s not like we are asking for something which may go beyond a month of sustaining this pretense. Here I am sitting in a full kombi, the usual ‘four- four formation’. Just before my eyes, I witness a sliding door operator(hwindi) insulting a woman for standing her ground and frankly not accepting coins as her change after paying her bus fare. I did not interfere  and try to play  hero in someone else’s fight due to fear of being left stranded in the middle of nowhere. Was it her fight entirely?

By Duduzile Mathema| Nust-Zw | @MathemaDuduzile

I quiver in anger at the thought of my selfish act at the time, but what could I have done?? It’s not like I would have been dropped off and I would have called my notorious brother to settle the score with the conductor on my behalf. At this moment and time as I reflect, I come to a realisation that all this transpired during the 16 days of activism against gender based violence. Where were the other women such as myself? As I hinted on our pretence earlier on,  I just wish that if only one of us, ‘women’, could have had the courage to speak for that lady maybe she would not have left the Kombi thinking that she is just a mere non-entity.

Here I am thinking that when women’s rights are being violated especially during these 16 days against gender based violence, it is all narrowed down to the domestic violence where the man is always the villain. The one to brutally bash the wife for not conforming to the duties which are expected of her. At heart, I am an activist who learnt a lesson today, that I hardly understand the concept of gender based violence. Embarrassing as it may sound, I desire for my fellow women at large to be aware of men or other women who sought to hurt them in ways which may go against the objectives of the 16 days of Activism against Gender Based violence.

According to the Zimbabwe Demography Health Survey (ZDHS) of 2015 34.8% of women are reported to have experienced violence in their lifetime. The ZDHS explains that violence of women is bound to happen regardless of geographical location, status, level of education and time. In as much as women who have received tertiary education are exonerated from the list of the abused, ZDHS of 2015 affirms that 1 in every 5 women is a victim even if she may be educated.

From 25 November 2016, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against women, to 10 December 2016, Human Rights Day, the 16 Days of Activism against Gender based Violence Campaign is a time to incite action to end violence against women and girls around the world.  “Orange the World: Raise Money to End Violence against Women and Girls”  is the theme for this year’s campaign. With education being at the core of this year’s campaign, women and children should not suffer any deprivation in terms of receiving education about the various forms of gender based violence which is usually inflicted on women. In the 2016 Action Kit the aspect of education has been disintegrated into the following criteria: non-discrimination and equality, right to information, best interest of the child, academic freedom, advanced levels of education, human rights education, technical and  vocational education, free and compulsory basic level education to all, freedom to choose and establish academic institutions.

The narration which came up at the beginning shows how women can suffer at the hands of the general community and yet nothing is done. The type of abuse that this woman was exposed to is psychological abuse. She let the conductor insult her whilst the majority of the women in the kombi did nothing to save the victim. What does it reflect on us as women?

However, in as much women are victims of gender based violence, it is necessary to make an observation of the fact that societal structures have a role to play in moulding such behaviours. Patriarchy is still prevalent within our society and women are considered as inferior beings as compared to men. Therefore, from the anecdote highlighted earlier, the victim may have tried to defend her actions but because she was having exchange of words with a man, she somehow lost the argument.

People have adopted a mentality of being self-absorbed in their own affairs at the expense of someone in dire need of assistance. When the conductor was in his moment of glory whilst humiliating this woman,none of the women in the kombi bothered to make the woman’s issue their own. Some continued in their conversations as though all was normal.

Putting the issue to rest, there are a few recommendations that I propose as a way of helping bring a reduction to the escalating figures of violence in Zimbabwe. Since I witnessed an act of abuse in a kombi, I believe that with all things being normal there is need for ALL taxis to have call lines where victims can be able to report cases of abuse so that they may be dealt with. During this time of the year whereby gender based violence is brewing in people’s kitchens, advocacy levels should be increased. Social media can be used for the greater good to push the message about gender based violence. Pastors in churches can further this campaign through speaking about it in their various denominations. Community dialogue could be heightened so that people can receive education about gender based violence.

Let’s orange it and help eradicate gender based violence.

Duduzile Michelle Zinzi Mathema is a Part 3 Student from the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) studying Journalism and Media Studies.

Zimbabwe students fighting GBV on campus

Sex Rights Africa Network | @SexRightsAfrica

When female students at tertiary colleges and universities in Zimbabwe call for action against gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual harassment (SH) on campus, they need up-to-date statistics to back up their claims that this is a widespread problem.

Research undertaken by the Female Students Network Trust (FSNT) in Zimbabwe in 2015 presents a clear picture of the nature and extent of GBV and SH that students endure, and make recommendations for protecting survivors and holding perpetrators and authorities accountable for the abuse.

FSNT’s baseline study, conducted in universities, polytechnics and teachers’ colleges, with support from the Czech Embassy and the Students and Academics International Help Fund, covered ten tertiary institutions and included 3425 students and staff. It confirmed the students’ claims that GBV and SH were ‘rampant’ on campus, particularly sexual harassment of female students by male lecturers, fellow male students and non-academic male employees.

Key findings from the research include:

Of the 2114 female students who participated through the questionnaire, 94% reported having encountered SH, compared to 3% of the 672 male students;

    Of the 1987 female students who had encountered SH:

        16% of female students said they had been raped by male students and 5% had been raped by male lecturers and non-academic staff;

        13% of female students reported date rape in relationships with older men (lecturers and non-academic staff) and 46% in relationships with male students;

        16% reported having been forced into unprotected sex in sexual encounters with lecturers; 10% in sexual encounters with non-academic staff and 43% with male students;

        32% of female students reported having been coerced into drinking alcohol or injecting drugs by older men (lecturers and non-academic staff) during date outings and thereafter sexual assaulted. 48% of female students reported the same during date outings with male students;

        64% of male students said they had given money or gifts in exchange for sex in the last year and 42% of female students reported that they had received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the last year. (In focus group discussions, men said that having ‘invested’ in female students they would resort to violence if their partners refused to have sex with them or had sex with someone else);

        85% of respondents reported knowing female students who were once forced by campus-men to abort an unintended pregnancy;

        74% of female students encountered offers of ‘favours’ (good grades/marks, extra academic help and study aids) by lecturers and 83% encountered offers of ‘favours’ (food, accommodation, transport and money) by non-academic staff and students, all in exchange for sex or sexual relationships;

        67% experienced unwanted physical contact (touching, patting and hugging) by lecturers, non-academic staff and students;

        93% experienced inappropriate remarks about their gender and sexuality (including sarcastic criticism of their weight, body parts such as breasts and buttocks, skin complexion, hairdo, cosmetics, dressing) by mostly male students;

        91% encountered wolf whistling – and of the 672 male students who completed the questionnaire, 90% reported having wolf whistled at a female student;

        79% of female students reported being intentionally excluded from meetings and processes because they were being held at gender insensitive environments and times.

The vast majority (94%) of female students who experienced GBV or SH said that they would not report to the authorities. Most (63.5%) said they had disclosed to someone (family member, friend, intimate partner, room mate, fellow church member).

The main reason given for not reporting was not knowing how to do so. However, female students also reported that campus security were more concerned about preventing student unrest that dealing with issues of GBV and SH.

Reporting to intimate partners seldom resulted in cases being taken up through the college/university system and would often result in physical gang fights between involved males. Female students said that being identified as victims of GBV and SH through reporting would jeopardise their current and future intimate relations and social image, and subject them to campus gossip and further male student bullying.

Responses to questions about the reasons for GBV and SH reflect an entrenched patriarchal culture, with fixed, unequal gender norms and normalised victim-blaming. Both female and male students said wolf-whistling was due to young women wearing tight or revealing clothing. The males said they were less likely to wolf-whistle at students who dressed ‘decently’. The main reason given for unwanted physical contact by both male and female respondents was that female students had ‘unknowingly sent a wrong message’ to offenders, who were generally people they knew.

 The study found that ‘female students fail to live their college lives fully making unreasonable behavioral and life style adjustments fully because of fear of SH in their living and learning environments’.

 However, it seemed this strategy would be unlikely to protect them since male students reported intense pressure – from both male and female lecturers – to outperform female students, to show contempt, competition and indifference towards female students, and to call a male who did not perform ‘woman’. Female students who outperformed males would be called tom-boys or labelled as having ‘balls’. Some female students would behave in a submissive way to avoid this.

 Both male and female students during FGDs said that male lecturers viewed sex with female students as part of their supplementary job benefits just like medical aid in the context of low and often delayed salaries. Male lecturers in interviews denied this though they said it was part of beer talk. A high proportion of male lecturers said female students ‘enticed them’ into relationships.

The report notes that there have been some efforts by the Zimbabwe government to demonstrate its commitment to eradicating GBV and SH Government – for example the creation of a separate ministry responsible for gender and women affairs, which has put in place a national GBV strategy.

FSNT has used the findings of the study to formulate a Sexual Harassment Monitoring Mechanism (SHMM) for tertiary institutions and to provide recommendations for improving accountability of authorities on GBV. FSNT

 Director Evernice Munando says the Trust has been advocating and lobbying strongly for SH policy formulation and effective implementation, engaging Zimbabwe’s parliamentary portfolio committees on Gender and Education to expedite the processes. Munando reported in April 2016: “Some universities and colleges are responding well [and] Midlands State University (MSU) has recently made its policy.”

 Let’s orange Campuses and advocate to stop Sexual Harassment 

 Article first published on 04 May 2016 at http://www.sexrightsafrica.net

Video published by ItsOnUsCampaign

GUILTY BY ASSOCIATION

by K Cheryl Mwanza| Episode #4

“What do you have then?” Dube asked as she sat on a desk closest to the white board. Celeste had a black marker in one hand and was standing before the board.

Danai stood next to her and when everyone’s attention was on them, he cleared his voice then opened his mouth to speak.

“We went through the letter and found various things that might be of assistance to your investigation. To begin with, the author of the letter had immense hatred for his mother but at the same time has a great appreciation of her-“

“Why is this important?” Dhlamini asked.

“Your killer is not going to stop with just this victim.” Celeste answered. “The hatred that he has for his mother is so intense, anyone who reminds him of her is in grave danger. You are looking at the profile of a serial killer in the making.”

“You said something about the killer appreciating his mother. How would that work when he has intense hatred for this said mother?” Dube asked, “And what is it exactly about the letter that gives you the impressions that he both hated and appreciated his mother?”

“The line about your victim and the killer’s mother wearing way too much perfume.” Celeste answered. “When you say it now, it means nothing, but you have to put that line in context. The only time your killer would have been bothered by his mother’s perfume would have been before he started liking women. That is before puberty. However it’s not the perfume itself your killer hated. It’s what it represented.”

“History has it that in the mid-eighties and early nineties, women of loose morals had a thing about wearing too much perfume. It was an indicator to potential customers. So to speak.” Danai added. “So your killer had somewhat of a flashback to his mother and ‘those days’ when he came across the victim.”

“On the appreciation side, the way he comments about the blackness of the victim and how she carried herself. We linked it back to his mother since this came soon after the line about the perfume. He was attracted to that. A woman comfortable and proud in her own skin.” Celeste ended by looking at the detective.

“I don’t get how someone can be attracted to the person he hates.” Dube stuck by her guns.

“It’s like when a white man believes he is better than people from other races, but finds himself lusting after a black woman.” Celeste answered. An awkward silence fell about the room after Celeste had said this. To ease the tension that was beginning to creep in, Dhlamini opened her mouth and said the first thing that came to her mind.

“So now we have the profile of the women the killer’s fancies. It would have been better if we had something more.”

“We actually have more.” Danai answered. “The opening of the letter is an indication that your victim was the killer’s first victim. The killing itself was to the killer like a first sexual experience-“

“That’s like a metaphor, right?” Dhlamini asked.

“No.” Danai answered. “The first half of the letter reads like a romantic novel. Because it was like that for the killer. He got both aroused and satisfied from the abduction to the torture, for him it was like sex.”

“The way the encounter is described shows that the killer is obviously violent but at the same time controlling and addicted to power. He gets his thrill from breaking people and watching them beg for mercy. Beg for their lives.” Celeste said, “Your killer is someone who works in a position that allows them to decide the fate of people. This job also allows him to watch people beg for their lives and at times, even lose their lives.”

“So someone who is a judge or used to be a judge?” Dhlamini asked. “Based on everything you have just said, that would make perfect sense. A judge has ultimate power over a convict’s life and sometimes that power results in the state executing the convict. An ex-judge on the other hand would have lost that power and would be looking for ways in which to get it back.”

“If that is the case, then we have to look at all criminal judges who at some point in their careers resulted in someone being executed. From then on we dig into their pasts and try to determine who has mommy issues.” She said as she walked away the table making some calls.

“There is something else, though.” Danai said. “From the way the letter is constructed, it doesn’t read like a confession or a cry for attention. It’s like the killer was telling a friend what was happening in his life. But then it’s like he hadn’t been in touch with that friend for a long time. So he wasn’t sure whether or not the friend would be interested in what was happening in his life.”

“Based on that, the killer sent the letter to Mrs. Mare not because she was a journalist. But because he considered her as a friend because at some point their lives intersected. Maybe not directly for Mrs. Mare, but that’s not how your killer saw it.”

“So the killer is obsessed with Cynthia?” Ngoni asked.

“Not necessarily. But all that is going to depend on how the relationship between the two of them manifests in his mind. For the moment your wife is safe because she reacted positively to the letter.”

“So his relationship with Cynthia has nothing to do with the murder.” Dube said, “ So why now? Why kill Laura now? Why use her murder to connect with Cynthia?”

“He was recently triggered by something that both reminded him of his mother and is connected to Cynthia.” Celeste swallowed hard to try and hide the excitement in her voice but she failed miserably. Pinching herself to stop smiling she added, “Unless your killer is stopped, he won’t stop killing.”

Before Dube had a chance to answer, Detective Mudiwa Chiwenga rushed into the station breathing heavily waving his cellphone in air. He drew everyone’s attention and by the time he had calmed down, everyone in the room was dying from curiosity.

Catching his breath, he calmly said, “Cynthia Mare’s editor just called me. Another letter just came through. Addressed to Cynthia.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUST TO HOST CONFERENCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES…

Adapted from the Southern Eye

By Mthandazo Nyoni

The conference, running under the theme Quality Assurance in Student Affairs: Towards Disability-Friendly Tertiary Institutions, will run from September 18 to 19 in Victoria Falls.

Nust spokesperson Felix Moyo told Southern Eye on Wednesday that the conference would deliberate on issues affecting students with disabilities at tertiary institutions.

Over 100 delegates from all over the world are expected to attend the event and share their experiences to guide policymakers.

“The aim of the conference is for people to discuss on best practices that can be adopted for students with disabilities at tertiary institutions,” Moyo said.

He said some of the topics to be tackled at the conference included individual differences, tertiary institutions’ challenges, laws and statutes governing best practices in students with disabilities, administration, institutional support on transition from high school to tertiary education, partnerships for quality of life for students with disabilities, and from disability to possibilities.

Last year, the Federation of Organisation of People with Disabilities in Zimbabwe appealed to government to create educational structures that cater for people with disabilities.

The organisation said most tertiary institutions in Zimbabwe did not have facilities for people living with disabilities.
It said lecturers conducted lessons using projectors and laptops.

They said as a result, this failed to take note of visually impaired students.

Most buildings at tertiary institutions were also said to be not user-friendly for students with disabilities.

RELIGION OBSTRUCTING WORLD PEACE

By Senamiso Moyo
Featured image
World Peace, a term that has been thrown around so often when people are discussing their dreams and aspirations. When a pot-bellied politician stands on a podium making empty promises to his people, world peace or a contribution towards it is often mentioned. Yet, in the year 2015 where the world has surely become more connected thanks to technology and easy accessibility to any part of the planet, peace in the world is no more realistic than Greek Mythology.
This brings to mind the fundamental question for all young people. Why even in this time, are we still praying for World Peace? Maybe that is the issue, people are praying and we never truly know to who and for what they are praying for, if religion and prayer truly work then surely someone’s prayers would be answered if they wanted the extermination of all Zimbabweans or as we often see nowadays, a person subsequently killing in the name of a God. Perhaps Religion is the main hindrance of World Peace.
Watching the news nowadays it’s become increasingly apparent that the nation of Islam feels insulted and undermined by the rest of the world and they have decided to strike back in the name of their God, The war for the Gaza strip between Israel and Palestine is based on differing religious beliefs with the Muslims striving to see the Jews wiped off the face of the earth, closer to home Boko Haram is causing havoc in Nigeria in order to uphold the beliefs of the Islamic state and the stereotypical characterisation given to all these people by the more developed countries who feel their religious beliefs are more coherent only angers them and the result of this is that there is no peace in the world.
It’s a sad conclusion to come to especially considering what religion is meant to represent. The truth is that even the most seemingly peaceful beliefs such as Christianity are flawed by hypocrisy and to a greater extent a lack of respect for other beliefs. It would be fair to say that if the world was one secular state there would be no killing in the name of a God or anger brought through undermining each other’s beliefs, peace in the world would still be far off, but there is no doubt that we would be a step closer.
Featured imageSenamiso is a law student at the University of the Witswaterand.