Teenage whizz-kid makes UZ history

History was made since the founding of the University of Zimbabwe in 1953 when 18-year-old academically-gifted Maud Chifamba graduated with a Bachelor of Accountancy Honours yesterday.

She was among 3 667 graduates from nine faculties and the College of Health Sciences who were capped by President Mugabe at the institution of higher learning.

As of 2012, Chifamba was the youngest university student in Africa. She was born in 1997 in Zimbabwe and was accepted to the University of Zimbabwe to read for an accounting degree.

The teenage whizz-kid began attending in 2012 and also received a $9 933 scholarship from the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority Chairman’s Charity Fund. Chifamba lost her father when she was five, in 2002, before she started first grade.

By that time, her mother was suffering from cancer and could not care for her and her brother, two years younger.

This prompted Maud to fall under the care of a step brother, who at the time was residing at a plot he had been allocated during the land reform programme in Hunters Road, in between Kwekwe and Gweru, Midlands Province, Zimbabwe.

In 2003 she started her first grade at a school named Hurudza Primary school. In 2005, when she was in grade 3, during the mid year exams, she was mistakenly given a grade 4 exam paper in which she scored 100 percent. The following term during the same year, she requested a Grade 5 test paper in which she achieved the highest score.

She proceeded to Grade seven and she had 6 units. As Chifamba did not have money for high school she studied on her own(home schooled) and completed her Ordinary Level in just two years, that was 2009. She was later identified by the Ministry of Education and awarded financial assistance for her advanced level, upper six in 2011 and she scored 12 points.

Her mother died of cancer that year. After making headlines internationally, Chifamba was awarded a $9,993 scholarship by the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority. In 2013 Chifamba scored distinctions at the University of Zimbabwe, where she was studying for her Bachelor of Accountancy Honours Degree.

She wrote her Grade seven examination at the age of 10 and her A-level at the age of 13. In 2007 Chifamba was named the best student under the most difficult conditions in the Midlands Province.

In December 2012, Chifamba was fifth on the Forbes Top 100 Youngest Powerful Women in Africa and she was also entered in the book of African Records as the youngest university student in the continent.

In October 2013, Chifamba was a delegate at the launching of a Terre des hommes campaign for girls in Rome, Italy. On 25 October 2013, Chifamba shared the high table at the International Day of the Girl Child celebrations with ministers and musicians. The event was hosted by UNICEF, held in Zimbabwe and she delivered a speech.

Faculties that graduated yesterday are Agriculture, Arts, Commerce, Education, Engineering, Law, Science, Social Studies and Veterinary Science. Of the graduates, 3 106 were conferred with first degrees, 535 with Masters Degrees and 25 with Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Among the graduates, 25 were conferred with Doctor of Philosophy degrees and from those graduating with bachelors’ degrees, 149 had first class passes. For the first time in the history of the University, an 18-year old student was also conferred with her Bachelor’s degree in Accounting.

The graduate, Maud Chifamba, joined the University at the age of 14 years and completed her degree at the age of 18 years. This year’s graduation ceremony also saw the first pioneering graduates of the Marondera University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology.

In his address, UZ Vice Chancellor Professor Levi Nyagura, described this year’s ceremony as historic saying all these achievements were a first in the 61 year history of the University. He said the University will continue to engage with various stakeholders and strategic partners for continuous improvement and to remain relevant.

“We do recognise that our society is getting more complex with dynamic varying sets of requirements,” said Prof Nyagura. He said this presented a challenge that called for a re-thinking of the nature of the public service the university should provide.

Prof Nyagura said to that end, the University’s focus should be more on socialisation of knowledge by making sure that the university produced highly-qualified professionals and that the best research results were transferred to society.

He said the UZ was also open to capture the knowledge generated by society so as to sustain and further develop the intellectual and cultural base of the country.

“In this endeavour, we have committed ourselves to participate in national projects that empower our country to be competitive regionally, continentally and internationally,” said Prof Nyagura.

He said in addition, the University also reviewed its curriculum to promote innovation, application of science and technology and entrepreneurship. “Our focus is to produce graduates with a strong foundation in science and technology and with problem solving and analytical skills,” he said.

Some of the training incorporated include Forensic Science, Geospatial Intelligence and Aeronautical Engineering. Prof Nyagura said the university had also excelled in the development of GIS (Geographic Information System) and Earth Observation Sciences.

“The motivation for this development is the realisation that geographic sciences are key to human security including disaster and emergency response, crime and terrorism prevention, surveillance of diseases and disease vector outbreaks,” he said.

He said the University’s GIS and Earth Observation Centre had since been assigned by the African Union to carry out two major tasks. Nyagura said the University also embarked on a number of projects aimed at increasing infrastructure to meet the growing demand of education.

These projects include a building complex with 10 state of the art lecture rooms with a combined sitting capacity of 1000, a pharmacy laboratory that accommodates 130 students and an engineering computer laboratory fully equipped with 100 state of the art computers.

The University also constructed three additional lecture rooms with a combined sitting capacity of 200 and is currently constructing a 1 100-seater modern lecture theatre.

Source: The Herald

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Photo Essay:#FeesMustFallReloaded 2016

#Storified from #Instagram: This photo essay illustrates the struggle of the #Fees2016 protests in South Africa which has led to temporary closure of public universities over the past week.

 

Give us feedback. Is free education feasible in South Afica???

Video: Catholic varsity students explain use of sex herbs in marriages

They were part of the of students drawn from various tertiary institutions in the country who converged at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) in Bulawayo under the banner of government iniatated Research and Intellectual Outputs-Science, Engineering and Technology (Rio-Set) to showcase innovative products that could be useful for the nation

Source: https://www.newsday.co.zw

THE BIG STORY: National university shut down in South Africa

  • Key Questions: What’s happening to Zimbos studying there? Are they back home? Do they have to travel acrosss that country to crush at relative’s places?

 

Johannesburg, 19 September 2016 – The Wits S-R-C says it’s going to continue to fight for free education. It believes it’s possible in South Africa. Video: eNCA
Johannesburg, 19 September 2016 – The former CEO of the Council On Higher Education says government is passing the buck.
JOHANNESBURG – Students on several campuses around the country have begun their intentions to stage a shut down at the designated campuses.

This follows Minister of Higher Education Blade Nzimande’s announcement on Monday that universities and colleges should increase fees by no more than 8% in 2017.
University of Witwatersrand (Wits)

Students at Wits university have vowed to shut down the university.

The university, however said the academic programme and all university activities continue as planned as extra security has been deployed on the campus.

REACTION: Fees announcement a ‘quick-fix’ not a solution: expert

Wits said security has been strengthened and police were on stand-by.

https://embed.iono.fm/epi/333165

 

University of Cape Town (UCT)

Meanwhile, UCT students gathered for a mass meeting following Nizmande’s announcement.

UCT suspended classes, lectures and tests on Monday.

Univerity of Pretoria (UP)

University of Pretoria students were also preparing for a shutdown, with reports of lectures being disrupted.

https://embed.iono.fm/epi/333149
University of Free State (UFS)

University of Free State students disrupted classes, following government’s 2017 fee hike recommendations.

The students and the Student Representative Council made the announcement that there will be no classes at least for the rest of the week.

eNCA

https://www.enca.com/south-africa/universities-shut-down-on-the-cards-0 (19 September 2016)

NOTICE: Calling for Volunteer Student Ushers for 2016 Graduation Ceremony

 TO ALL NUST STUDENTS: (27 September) 2016 Graduation Ceremony, 4th November, 2016 Calling for Volunteer Student Ushers for the 2016 Graduation Ceremony. If interested, please visit the Career Guidance & Employment Office for registration: • Registration begins : 28th September, 2016 • Registration closes : 30th September, 2016 • Venue : Office # WG7 and WG8, Division of Students Affairs NB: There are limited spaces – first come, first served

LIFE HACK: VOTER APATHY & WHY IT IS A PROBLEM

By Crispen Rateiwa| Nust-ZW

 So many  issues affect students, yet a few cast votes effectively surrendering power and overall decision making to a small student segment 

What are the effects of voter apathy? How does boycotting participation in student council elections affect our welfare? Why are youths taking this right to choose a representative through ballot casting for granted?  What can be done to increase the level of voter participation? The more students understand the benefits of voting in student elections, the more increase in the level of voter participation.

Colleges and universities are places were election reform and systems could be studied and tested. Each academic year student representative council (SRC) elections are held. However, there is widespread low voter turnout characteristic of the national electoral system. Voting is a duty, but people ignore this and a scant percent of eligible voters cast ballots.

The present and future generation of students should learn to value and enjoy democracy. In the first and second Chimurenga, Zimbabweans successfully fought for freedom ideals and principles. The greatest barrier to voting is the lack of patriotism in a majority of young adults. Students should revisit history and understand that in the second Chimurenga, the black majority fought for one man one vote – voting as the ability to use our voices, to make things happen.

Anyone who has interest in their welfare should care about politics. When the biggest student segment fails to take part in elections, they automatically surrender their entire academic year welfare to the student council elected by a small segment. What this means is the elected council will only serve, consult and do what pleases its voter constituency thereby sidelining issues and views relevant to the majority students. It is almost as if they don’t exist at all, as long as they don’t mobilize and force the student council to listen to them. Voter apathy affect students in all spheres of life.

Generally, only about 25% of students cast their votes in student council elections. What could be the reason? Is it issueless campaigns? Is it an insufficient electoral system? Is it because they are uninformed and uninterested? Surely, if there is no good candidate, why can not one field themselves for the posts? Many students claim that their courses do not allow much time for extra-curricular activities such as voting. When asked why they do not vote, many people report that they have too little free time. Some may argue that incumbency advantage and student representative council unresponsiveness to constituent desires is enough to deter even the most politically conscience person from voting. The right to vote is not seen as powerful, it is seen as pointless. However, students need to know that voices really can change the system.

Just like in national elections, student politics conforms to a pattern that whoever has the most money and big business support will have the best ads and with them, an improved public image. The vote is not seen as influential, as it does not translate to genuine student representation. This leads to elected student representative council unresponsiveness to constituent desires, but to their sponsors. Many voters are discouraged that their views are not represented by their elected student representatives, and consequently, that they have no real power in their student council.

“I feel politicians are fake, they claim to represent us. Actually, they represent powerful business people and politicians who sponsor their colourful public campaigns. Some get bribed when they get influential positions” said a NUST student, on condition of anonymity.

vote-initiative

What must be done?

The desire to vote is one that needs to be taught. Tertiary level students need education on political matters so that they differentiate propaganda and buzzwords and focus on reality of issues at hand when they vote. Political awareness or voter education in school need to be established in order for university and college youths to participate politically. Thus, students need the important message that their vote matters and as soon as they start to vote they are more likely to continue voting, as they grow older.

A needlessly archaic voting procedure that creates barriers to voting should be dealt with. Internet voting would increase voting by drastic standards. University students have excellent access to computers and enjoy using them. Online voting would be an excellent means by which to not only simplify the process, but increase its accessibility as well. Internet voting provides a great deal of ease for voters, allowing them to vote from the comfort of their home or even from a dorm room. Telephone voting, early voting, and absentee voting can also be considered for those who have difficulty making it to the polls. Schools, libraries, and work places all have internet access. These plausible and indispensable alternatives skyrockets voting availability. Students on attachment can also vote! Aren’t they also paying fees?

Voting can be made fun and rewarding through multimedia. Internet graphics, pictures, and sounds can attract young, first time voters in tertiary institutions. The internet has become a useful resource and (powerful) advertising tool for many political candidates. Politicians need to court virgin voters through new information technology. Advertising campaign and candidate information web sites could increase issue awareness; thereby, getting young people excited about voting.  Politicians should successfully run engaging social media handles such as facebook, twitter, youtube and Instagram.

Since all paid up university students are eligible to vote, they would be expected to vote. At university, a student identity card qualifies one to vote in student council polls. Fines should be enacted upon those who do not show up at polls on election day. After an election is held, voter checklists should be monitored for no-show voters, and these persons should be sent a notice for a fine. Should this fine not be paid within a set time limit, these non-voters would face a disciplinary hearing for a more significant punishment.

Capture2.PNG

In order to aid voters to follow through with their constitutional right, and avoid fines, universities and colleges must provide transportation to all eligible students, especially those learning in places away from the main campus to the polls at no expense. To eliminate excuses many non-voters give such as the burdensomeness to travel to polls, transportations is necessary.

To increase voter turnout there is need to eliminate wasted votes. In order to assure the electorate that their vote counts, the electoral system should allow vote casting according to the voter preferences. The voter will mark against his or her best five candidates in order of the first choice to the last fifth choice. This system more accurately targets the student’s choice for the student council. Instead of voting for just one candidate, a voter would rank them in preference. Therefore, if a voter’s first choice for office has no chance of attaining a majority of the vote, the voter’s second choice would receive the vote. This style of voting system would especially attract young voters, giving them reassurance that their vote will not be wasted if they don’t initially vote with a mainstream political candidate or party. This ensures limited cases of vote boycotts as the outcome remains unpredictable.

Proportional representation makes elections more exciting to the electorate because their voice and vote will make a difference. For example, a 50/ 50 gender representation in student elections encourages both men and women to vote; everyone would be fairly represented according to his or her vote. A system of unequal representation has mainly sidelined women.

Political conscience is important and institutions should provide credible platforms that allows issue-based campaigns and ideology based campaigns to take center stage during election period so that the electorate make informed decisions in the ballot box. There is need to aim for 100 percent voter turnout to avoid situations where politicians generate benefits for those who vote, and mostly ignore those who don’t. Strong media coverage and public debate provide the best means to distinguish between candidates. Both campus print and broadcasting media should contribute free airtime to every student political candidate.

Conclusion

The more the rise in voter turnouts and youth participation in student representative council (SRC) elections, the more representative the council is of the people.  So many political, academic, social, economic and technological issues affect students, yet a few cast votes thereby surrendering power and overall decision making to a small student segment throughout the academic year.

If only the middle – and upper- income students turn out at the polls, student politicians can concentrate on the issues pertaining to that group of people. Lower – income and working- class student views will be trashed. Implementation of programs such as internet voting, better voter education, and an election day holiday are necessary to fight voter apathy. Other notable point, although debatable is making voting compulsory, which has a direct and dramatic effect on turnout. Last but not least, there should be more secure polling stations.

Crispen Rateiwa is the chairperson of College Youth Art Club and president of Democratic Alliance for Academic (DAA). He is a publishing studies student at National University of Science and Technology. You can contact him on crisrateiwa@gmail.com. This article only focuses on student elections in tertiary institutions. You can read more articles by him on ayaasite.wordpress.com

 

Diary of a Zimbo studying Abroad: “Hong Kong culture more classist than racist”

by Getrude Gwenzi | @JusG_G  (tw)| Lingnan University-Hong Kong

I have been living in Hong Kong for a month now. I have been observing this society with interest and making my own observations so that I do not succumb to generalizations and assumptions of how Chinese people are or ought to be.

I want to tackle the subject  of racism which was really sparked by the following video:

To summarise; this black woman got onto the MTR (train service) and the moment she sat down the Chinese woman sitting next to her took out a tissue and covered her mouth. I MEAN!!!I would be outraged. I have been on the MTR myself in the past month and I must say I have observed some weird behaviors by some Chinese people(not all); such as:

  • choosing to leave their seat and stand up when you sit next to them
  • being stared at like you have done something wrong just by entering the train
  • refusing to even touch you or your elbow even when the train is clearly full and it cannot be avoided

But someone covering their mouth after you sit next to them???I don’t think I would have this woman’s courage to stand up and speak against such behavior. So this post also applauds her confidence and pride in herself as a black person in Hong Kong. It sparked a lot of debate around racism and basic ignorance of some Chinese people which explains their behavior towards minorities.

“…if this is such a modern society why are we still having labels at all?…”

I decided to read further about how black people are generally perceived in Hong Kong. The truth is we (black people) are a minority and although Hong Kong is described as a diverse, first world city; there are not many black people relocating to this city in their numbers. Mainland China seems to have the greater numbers of black people living there. So I came across an article stating that Hong Kong is in essence a classist society not a racist society. This means no matter what race you are, if you look like you are upper class you will be treated with respect.

If you dress like the Hong Kong people; that is wearing flashy designer clothes and watches then they will not feel threatened by you being black. The general assumption is that black people relocating to Hong Kong are usually academics with high academic qualifications or they own businesses and come to Hong Kong on business  and return to their countries. So these groups are not discriminated against and they are not that many to even worry about.

The Filipinos, Indonesians and other East Asian minorities are the ones with the “poor illegal immigrant” label in Hong Kong,not black people. This is only because of our small numbers so this is a mild comfort. Does it make it OK though?

My question is if this is such a modern society why are we still having labels at all? Why do we only respect blacks when they are educated and belonging to the upper class? So you are going to cover your nose when the “ordinary looking” black person sits next to you and you call yourself evolved? I know that any capitalist country will have classism as an issue and that is a whole other battle to fight. Our humanity is such that we fear anything that is different from us and we would rather not associate with it. And by “we” I mean all of us. Even black people say racist things about Chinese people and that is not OK either. It is our lack of understanding and it is sad that it has been discussed over and over and yet there is still no one with a solution to the problem.

My social investigations continue…but the experiences of that young woman and her mother on the MTR show that racism is alive and will not be going anywhere anytime soon…

Article first published on Getty’s personal blog: https://moretogetty.wordpress.com .Getty @jusgee_gee (IG), has bagged 2 degrees already and has just started work on her 3rd, a PHD. She’s in Hong Kong and is happy to share her experiences with all of us. Read On!!

 

#CampusMomentsAfterDark: The 6 Foods You Should Never Eat Before Having Sex

Picture this: You’re sweaty, out of breath, and sore at the core. Is it ab day at the gym? Or just some good ol’ fashioned mattress dancing? Either way, what you eat before any kind of physical activity can affect your performance. In terms of sex, bloating, fatigue, or indigestion, certain foods can significantly decrease libido. So if you’re expecting a roll in the hay after your Tinder date, steer clear of ordering dishes with these anti-aphrodisiacs

1. Indian Food

Pungent spices used in Indian-cuisine, like curry, turmeric, and cumin, sneak into your pores and linger there for a few days. While these aromas are heavenly in food, they stank on skin. So do your sexual partner a favor and skip the curried chicken perfume. If you can’t resist, check out these tips to get your hands to stop smelling like tikka masala.

2. Spicy Food

One minute you’re enjoying that hot, spicy meal, and the next — just when you’re about to shake the sheets — you regret every bite. Depending on how much you eat, spicy foods can cause heartburn, acid reflux, indigestion, and worst of all…fiery poop.

3. Bean-Based Foods

Hummus, chili, black bean burgers — you name it. Where there’s a bean, there’s a fart just waiting to ruin the bedroom rodeo. These kidney-shaped legumes contain sugar molecules your stomach and small intestines find difficult to digest. By the time these sugars reach our colon, bacteria breaks it down into a cloud of gas, making you feel puffy at the gut and weak at the groin.

4. Starchy Carbs

We all love carbs, but too much of them can drop blood sugar levels and make you sluggish and tired — not ideal if you plan to sexercise. When you eat hot chips, for example, you get a surge of energy from the carbohydrates. But once your body starts to break down and remove that energy, you lose your thunder and ultimately crash. To keep it exciting in bed, avoid eating carb-heavy meals like pasta or white rice.

5. Asparagus

If you’re a picky eater who won’t eat anything green, then you’re off the hook for this one. But for all of you asparagus-loving bros out there — beware. Once eaten, these tender green shoots break down into a sulfur-like substance called asparagusic acid.In as little as 15 minutes, this acid travels all throughout your body. That means when it’s time to go down, stuff not only smells funky but tastes sour.

6. Onions and garlic

To all you ladies, it’s important to remember that your cha-cha is a little ecosystem. Anything that throws it off balance can result in unpleasant odors, among other things. Strong-smelling, pungent-tasting foods like onions and garlic might slightly change the odor of your…um…secretions. So if you’re looking to get turned on later, skip the caramelized onions and garlic sauce.

Now that you know about the major food no-no’s, you can safely make the bacon without any smells, discomfort, or embarrassment. May the food you eat be in your favor.

Article originally published by: https://spoonuniversity.com.| images credits: https://spoonuniversity.com & www.homemadebyyou.co.uk

CHINHOYI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN TO RELEASE DEBUT ALBUM THIS MONTH

The album titled ‘PaChinhoyi’ seeks to advance the idea of togetherness and celebrates the beauty of African resorts among other issues.

CHINHOYI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY School of Art & Design to release debut album this month!


CUT15 is an Afropop music group based at CUT which started last year when students and staff came together and record a track titled ‘Beautiful Zimbabwe’. The group aims to facilitate creative expression among students, staff and the larger community.

CUT school of Art and Design Dean, Dr Wonderful Bere said a number of strategies have been put in place to maintain and grow the band adding that as part of the university vision, the band will launch its first album on the 14th of this month.

CUT15 band manager, Russell Chawabvudza said the band will continue to be a permanent feature of the university as it comprises students and staff. He said the album titled ‘PaChinhoyi’ seeks to advance the idea of togetherness and celebrates the beauty of African resorts among other issues.

College and school bands normally falter if talented students leave institutions but the Chinhoyi University is now working on new strategies aimed at countering the challenge. Source-ZBC ONLINE NEWS-

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