4 study skills that will help you succeed in your career

Erica Cirino
2 minute read

If you’re like most college students, much of your time outside of class is spent studying. Studying is an important part of college, one that goes beyond just helping to get you good grades. It’s a part of your academic routine that—whether you realize it or not — prepares you for a career as well.

Here are four study skills in particular that can carry over into your career:


Figuring out how long it will take you to complete an assignment or review for an exam isn’t an exact science. Every student is different, so each student requires a different amount of time for studying. Over time, you’ll figure out how to best manage your time.

Good time management means you get your assignments done on time (or well ahead of time), but it also means you pace yourself appropriately so that you’re producing the highest quality of work possible. Knowing how to keep and follow a calendar is another important part of time management.

Just as you need good time management when studying, you need it when you enter the working world. If you establish a time management habit that works for you in college, you can easily apply it to your career when it comes to accomplishing various tasks for your company.


College students are required to read a lot — from textbooks to novels to research journals to newspapers, and everything in between. Reading in college goes beyond just taking in words; it means absorbing and understanding their meaning so you can remember certain ideas and facts for your tests and assignments.

No matter what career you choose, you can likely expect more reading — whether it be research for a meeting or important email communications. That’s why it’s important to become a strong reader in college. Learn how to highlight and take notes when you read, and also how to pace yourself to truly digest the content.


A key part of successful studying is keeping yourself organized. It’s hard to argue the fact that it’s much easier to get your work done with a clean desk than a messy one. The same goes for a neat vs. messy bookbag.

Organization means different things to different students. Yet, no matter what your organization style, the key idea of being organized is to know exactly where your things are when you need them.

Being organized is also important for your career. As a working adult, you’ll need to keep track of many important documents, bills, schedules and more. Learning how to keep your things in order while still a college student will make your transition to a working adult much easier.


Many college students find being part of a study group to be helpful to their academics. Studying with others can give you more motivation to study, and your study buddies may be able to help you through especially challenging classes.

But being a part of a study group has another benefit: from deciding when to meet to collaborating on group projects, studying with others teaches you how to work as part of a team.

Being a team player is a critical career skill. In most careers, you’ll have to interact with others. The more social skills you build while in college, the more easily you’ll be able to achieve greatness with other people in your workplace.

Erica Cirino is a contributing writer for Varsity Tutors, a live learning platform that connects students with personalized instruction to accelerate academic achievement.
First Published by  USA Today College 

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